Instagram tag withbutterfliesandwarriors

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - just to follow up on yesterday
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - just to follow up on yesterday’s post, this is relocating elephants from Lewa/Borana landscape northern Kenya, to Tsavo - these are persistent offenders, breaking fences and raiding adjoining farms. This translocation is designed to relocate specific elephants, in this case 9 in total, to areas less prevalent to occurrences of conflict. This is by no means perfect, however, it’s a compromise given the alternative would almost certainly be retaliatory attacks from those subject to the elephants raids. What’s interesting here is the shear number of people who given the opportunity; and in this case as the transfer from truck to trailer happened outside of the conservancies this was available to the general public, who turn out to simply see the wildlife that they often live alongside, rarely see, and generally derive little benefit from. We have to allow those who share their lands to not only share in the benefits derived from them, but also understand and appreciate the issues surrounding their very presence on these lands. Big shout out here to all involved in this complex operation, particularly @kenyawildlifeservice@lewa_wildlife@boranaconservancy@savetheelephants without whose support and expertise this wouldn’t have been possible. Not ideal as I said, but given the inevitable alternative a good result for these elephants currently - I’ll be updating shortly from Tsavo on how they’ve settled in - follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#elephant#africa#kenya
15.02.2019 12:11:46
Posted @withrepost • @natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This i
Posted @withrepost@natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
13.02.2019 12:56:14
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Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Row
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors#nationalgeographic#animals#beautiful#world#woman#respect
13.02.2019 12:32:18
I absolutely LOVE #elephants and this picture just makes me melt 😩😻💗
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Posted @w
I absolutely LOVE #elephants and this picture just makes me melt 😩😻💗 . Posted @withrepost@natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
13.02.2019 01:11:06
#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the ext
#Repost@natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
12.02.2019 20:21:11
Restless, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors
Restless, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors...more
12.02.2019 12:26:59
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#Repost @natgeo
• • • • •
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is t
#Repost@natgeo • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
12.02.2019 07:10:55
#Repost @natgeo
• • • • •
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is t
#Repost@natgeo • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
12.02.2019 05:32:42
#repost via @natgeo 👉 Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the e
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#repost via @natgeo 👉 Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
12.02.2019 04:10:22
great... now my dumb ass is gonna actively seek out baby elephants so I can blow
great... now my dumb ass is gonna actively seek out baby elephants so I can blow my hot ass breath in their trunks.... smh #Repost@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
12.02.2019 02:29:12
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#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the ext
#Repost@natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
11.02.2019 23:30:31
Bucket list goal: meet a baby elephant, pray it lifts its trunk up to me, establ
Bucket list goal: meet a baby elephant, pray it lifts its trunk up to me, establish a life long friendship 😍 #Repost@natgeo with @get_repost ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
11.02.2019 21:39:09
Posted @withrepost • @natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This i
Posted @withrepost@natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
11.02.2019 20:11:52
#Repost @natgeo
• • • • •
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is t
#Repost@natgeo • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
11.02.2019 19:22:42
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It just makes me sick to my stomach seeing and reading horrifying stories and te
It just makes me sick to my stomach seeing and reading horrifying stories and testaments about poaching such beautiful creatures. Poachers harm these animals just for profit? God bless those who dedicate their lives in order to protect them. It just heartbreaking to see this over and over. We need to change. #Repost@thephotosociety with @get_repost ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor - I think it might be worth posting this, I suggest many might not want to go past the first frame in the carousel. I’ve worked in Kenya for many years now and on this occasion I was working on elephant poaching that had seriously spiked. If you imagine the scene - we had raced at breakneck speed across appalling terrain in response to the sound of gunshots. We arrived just after sunset and my main concern was that we were loosing light. We found a ranger who was on foot and walked to the rough location of the shot. What hit me first was a smell from my youth whilst working part time in a butchers shop, it stopped me dead in my tracks and transported me to another place years ago. In front of me I could see a sleeping elephant, it was incredibly calm, and yet I could smell meat. As we slowly moved forwards we could see it wasn’t breathing; we still weren’t aware if those responsible for the gunshot were there, or not. Then it became obvious that in front of me was a trunk, a severed trunk. We froze. Often poachers will cut the face from the elephant inc tusk and trunk, fled the scene and remove the ivory away from the incident. I still couldn’t work out why the sleeping elephant was there, and where was the poached one ? As I moved around to the front of the elephant I literately slumped onto my knees. The tranquil scene was now one of utter brutality. I will never forget this scene. Nor will I forget those who work to stop this, and those who take in the orphans from such events. I love elephants, they continue to reduce me to tears in so many ways, most often laughter, occasionally not. Keep engaged. Keep them alive 👍🏿👍🏼🐘💚❤️ follow me @chancellordavid#fightingextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors
10.02.2019 03:47:52
Photograph by David Chancellor - I think it might be worth posting this, I sugge
Photograph by David Chancellor - I think it might be worth posting this, I suggest many might not want to go past the first frame in the carousel. I’ve worked in Kenya for many years now and on this occasion I was working on elephant poaching that had seriously spiked. If you imagine the scene - we had raced at breakneck speed across appalling terrain in response to the sound of gunshots. We arrived just after sunset and my main concern was that we were loosing light. We found a ranger who was on foot and walked to the rough location of the shot. What hit me first was a smell from my youth whilst working part time in a butchers shop, it stopped me dead in my tracks and transported me to another place years ago. In front of me I could see a sleeping elephant, it was incredibly calm, and yet I could smell meat. As we slowly moved forwards we could see it wasn’t breathing; we still weren’t aware if those responsible for the gunshot were there, or not. Then it became obvious that in front of me was a trunk, a severed trunk. We froze. Often poachers will cut the face from the elephant inc tusk and trunk, fled the scene and remove the ivory away from the incident. I still couldn’t work out why the sleeping elephant was there, and where was the poached one ? As I moved around to the front of the elephant I literately slumped onto my knees. The tranquil scene was now one of utter brutality. I will never forget this scene. Nor will I forget those who work to stop this, and those who take in the orphans from such events. I love elephants, they continue to reduce me to tears in so many ways, most often laughter, occasionally not. Keep engaged. Keep them alive 👍🏿👍🏼🐘💚❤️ follow me @chancellordavid#fightingextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#Repost : @thephotosociety , 😥🙏
10.02.2019 03:22:17
Photograph by David Chancellor - I think it might be worth posting this, I sugge
Photograph by David Chancellor - I think it might be worth posting this, I suggest many might not want to go past the first frame in the carousel. I’ve worked in Kenya for many years now and on this occasion I was working on elephant poaching that had seriously spiked. If you imagine the scene - we had raced at breakneck speed across appalling terrain in response to the sound of gunshots. We arrived just after sunset and my main concern was that we were loosing light. We found a ranger who was on foot and walked to the rough location of the shot. What hit me first was a smell from my youth whilst working part time in a butchers shop, it stopped me dead in my tracks and transported me to another place years ago. In front of me I could see a sleeping elephant, it was incredibly calm, and yet I could smell meat. As we slowly moved forwards we could see it wasn’t breathing; we still weren’t aware if those responsible for the gunshot were there, or not. Then it became obvious that in front of me was a trunk, a severed trunk. We froze. Often poachers will cut the face from the elephant inc tusk and trunk, fled the scene and remove the ivory away from the incident. I still couldn’t work out why the sleeping elephant was there, and where was the poached one ? As I moved around to the front of the elephant I literately slumped onto my knees. The tranquil scene was now one of utter brutality. I will never forget this scene. Nor will I forget those who work to stop this, and those who take in the orphans from such events. I love elephants, they continue to reduce me to tears in so many ways, most often laughter, occasionally not. Keep engaged. Keep them alive 👍🏿👍🏼🐘💚❤️ follow me @chancellordavid#fightingextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors
09.02.2019 19:02:34
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - this is the extraordinary Kati
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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - this is the extraordinary Katie Rowe @katie.rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it, that done, it will remember you forever, you will never be strangers again, a bond of trust is established @r.e.s.c.u.e - Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu, northern Kenya is home to the first community owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub; we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range, I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to Rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, whilst creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, The Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephant that are cared for by the Samburu community, are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment, that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods, and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
05.02.2019 22:30:24
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - an orphaned baby elephant scut
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - an orphaned baby elephant scuttles across an arid landscape, Tanzania - it’s often only when you come across images like this that you realise the extraordinary survival challenges faced by wildlife in these magnificent but challenging landscapes. Without its mother orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it, that done, it will remember you forever, you will never be strangers again, a bond of trust is established @r.e.s.c.u.e - Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu, northern Kenya is home to the first community owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub; we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range, I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to Rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, whilst creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, The Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephant that are cared for by the Samburu community, are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment, that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods, and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e#withbutterfliesandwarriors
05.02.2019 17:22:12
Jangan lupa Like, Komen & Share , Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | H
Jangan lupa Like, Komen & Share , Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid#withbutterfliesandwarriors#Discovery#discoverychannel#discoveryindonesia#nationalgeographic#natgeo#natgeoindonesia#nationalgeographic.id
19.12.2018 18:24:44
#repost from @natgeo 
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in north
#repost from @natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid#withbutterfliesandwarriors
18.12.2018 18:06:41
#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in norther
#Repost@natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid#withbutterfliesandwarriors
18.12.2018 10:58:48
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling
186.1K 599
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid#withbutterfliesandwarriors
18.12.2018 09:05:06
via @natgeo ・・・
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior
via @natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - from 'with butterflies and warriors' - ranger recruits are selected from all tribes across northern Kenya thus allowing ranger teams to protect wildlife and people without fear of tribal conflict. The recruits are portrayed at the end of a days camouflage and ambush training. They are carrying sticks that represent the actual weapons that they will be issued with once their training is complete and they have attained Kenya Police Reservist status, then can then operate alongside other rangers protecting wildlife and people here in northern Kenya. It is obvious that without the support and agreement of those who live alongside wildlife to safeguard a wide range of species, not just the iconic ones, we have no hope of preserving this region, let alone the rest of the planet. This is living 'with butterflies and warriors’...an ongoing project in the rangelands of northern Kenya - To see more of this project and other work, follow me here @chancellordavid@everydayextinction@thephotosociety@natgeo#withbutterfliesandwarriors#kenya#northernkenya#samburu#wildlife
17.09.2018 05:46:34
Regrann from @natgeo -  Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage
Regrann from @natgeo - Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - from 'with butterflies and warriors' - ranger recruits are selected from all tribes across northern Kenya thus allowing ranger teams to protect wildlife and people without fear of tribal conflict. The recruits are portrayed at the end of a days camouflage and ambush training. They are carrying sticks that represent the actual weapons that they will be issued with once their training is complete and they have attained Kenya Police Reservist status, then can then operate alongside other rangers protecting wildlife and people here in northern Kenya. It is obvious that without the support and agreement of those who live alongside wildlife to safeguard a wide range of species, not just the iconic ones, we have no hope of preserving this region, let alone the rest of the planet. This is living 'with butterflies and warriors’...an ongoing project in the rangelands of northern Kenya - To see more of this project and other work, follow me here @chancellordavid@everydayextinction@thephotosociety@natgeo#withbutterfliesandwarriors#kenya#northernkenya#samburu#wildlife
12.09.2018 15:27:55
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior training, northe
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - from 'with butterflies and warriors' - ranger recruits are selected from all tribes across northern Kenya thus allowing ranger teams to protect wildlife and people without fear of tribal conflict. The recruits are portrayed at the end of a days camouflage and ambush training. They are carrying sticks that represent the actual weapons that they will be issued with once their training is complete and they have attained Kenya Police Reservist status, then can then operate alongside other rangers protecting wildlife and people here in northern Kenya. It is obvious that without the support and agreement of those who live alongside wildlife to safeguard a wide range of species, not just the iconic ones, we have no hope of preserving this region, let alone the rest of the planet. This is living 'with butterflies and warriors’...an ongoing project in the rangelands of northern Kenya - To see more of this project and other work, follow me here @chancellordavid@everydayextinction@thephotosociety@natgeo#withbutterfliesandwarriors#kenya#northernkenya#samburu#wildlife
12.09.2018 14:45:42
butterfly people - the wonderful ladies of the Samburu, northern Kenya - #withbu
butterfly people - the wonderful ladies of the Samburu, northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors - work in progress ❤️🦋
12.09.2018 10:43:13
Kicked off 2018 with the a revamp for @chancellordavid
Kicked off 2018 with the a revamp for @chancellordavid...more
07.09.2018 08:45:32
Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - ranger recruits are selected from
Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - ranger recruits are selected from all tribes across northern Kenya thus allowing ranger teams to protect wildlife and people without fear of tribal conflict. Here the recruits are asked to select something that resembles the weapon that they will be issued with once training is complete, and they have attained Kenya Police Service reservist status. Here they are being trained in the skills of camouflage. ——————- It is obvious that without the support and agreement of those who live alongside wildlife to safeguard a wide range of species, not just the iconic ones, we have no hope of preserving this region, let alone the rest of the planet. This is living 'with butterflies and warriors’...an ongoing project in the rangelands of northern Kenya. ———————- To see more follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@everydayextinction@thephotosociety and the link below ————— https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/wildlife-conservation-samburu-kenya-animals #withbutterfliesandwarriors#kenya#northernkenya#samburu
05.09.2018 15:16:58
A rainstorm passes over the Ewaso Nyiro River in northern Kenya - photograph by
A rainstorm passes over the Ewaso Nyiro River in northern Kenya - photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid ——————— ‘With butterflies and warriors’ - National Geographic @natgeo - link below....... Across Africa growing populations and deepening poverty have intensified the battle between man and animals for the same land and environmental resources. Increasingly, animals are pushed into smaller pockets of wilderness, their migration routes closed off and their water supplies damned and increasingly used for crop irrigation. Illegal hunting and poaching has decimated their numbers. At the same time, rural farmers have learned to mistrust wildlife, killing those animals who have encroached further in to their land. If wildlife conservation is to succeed at all, it is imperative to find a way for man and animal to coexist in sustainable harmony. Its also crucially important that any income generated from the wildlife is shared with the communities who may face financial hardship as result of the destruction of crops by elephant, death of livestock by leopard and lion, and family members killed or maimed by all three. Communities must be given the options for incentives to preserve rather than poach. We are, after all, asking pastoralist communities who historically have not benefited from the wildlife that they live alongside, to live in harmony with it, rather than eradicate it in favour of livestock. Without the support of those who live alongside wildlife, we have no hope of preserving this region. But with them, there’s room for conservation, and globally something resembling transformation. The work done here is broad and specific, urgent and delicate. It is the work of butterflies and warriors —————- To see more follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@everydayextinction@thephotosociety and the link below ————— https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/wildlife-conservation-samburu-kenya-animals #withbutterfliesandwarriors#kenya#northernkenya#samburu
30.08.2018 10:43:04
#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David
#Repost@natgeo ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
19.06.2018 09:27:40
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the dappled light from surroun
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the dappled light from surrounding trees falls on a large scale photographic print from the series ‘beast’ - this is from ongoing work in the north of scotland #invermarkestate#cairngormsnationalpark and is currently on show alongside existing work from #hunters and community based conservation in the rangelands of #northernkenya#withbutterfliesandwarriors at La Gacilly-Baden Photo Festival - I’m delighted to have work on show here and have the opportunity to lead groups around the exhibit - beautifully curated and showing outdoors in the spectacular gardens in Baden, Austria, so powerful putting this work back into a living landscape. Really focuses ones attention as to how important maintaining the worlds delicate ecosystems really is. Powerful work in a delicate beautiful landscape 👍🏿👍🏼 La Gacilly-Baden Photo-festival -Thank you for your incredible support @photofestivallagacilly#baden#conservation#wildlife@thephotosociety@hellokiosk@natgeo@geomagazin@everydayextinction@rabia.kader@artfuldodgersimaging@francescamaffeogallery@filmsnotdead#fightingextinction 🙏🏼🙏🏿🌻 repost from, and thanks to, the wonderful @edalcock
09.06.2018 10:08:31
Isn't this the truth? 💜
#Repost @natgeo
• • •
Photograph by David Chancellor @ch
Isn't this the truth? 💜 #Repost@natgeo • • • Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
09.06.2018 10:03:06
What a hero! 
#Repost from @natgeo
.
.
. ... Photograph by David Chancellor @cha
What a hero! #Repost from @natgeo . . . ... Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
08.06.2018 16:16:43
#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David
#Repost@natgeo ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
08.06.2018 11:47:01
#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavi
#Repost@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
08.06.2018 09:27:47
Huge fan of Sir David! 😇💜💜😇 #Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photograph by Davi
Huge fan of Sir David! 😇💜💜😇 #Repost@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
08.06.2018 08:58:16
Repost from @natgeo using @RepostRegramApp - Photograph by David Chancellor @cha
Repost from @natgeo using @RepostRegramApp - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
08.06.2018 03:44:33
#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavi
#Repost@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
08.06.2018 02:18:25
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talkin
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction@tempat_wisata_terindah#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction#sanparks#krugerpark#okavango#africanature#aboutsouthafrica#travelafrica#okavangodelta#giraffes
08.06.2018 01:44:13
@Regrann from @natgeo - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir D
@Regrann from @natgeo - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
07.06.2018 22:33:44
He's still on my top 10 of who would you invite to dinner list. We have to disco
He's still on my top 10 of who would you invite to dinner list. We have to disconnect to re connect. #Repost@natgeo • • • Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
07.06.2018 19:57:51
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talkin
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
07.06.2018 19:34:40
I love this photo. 
#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancell
I love this photo. #Repost@natgeo ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
07.06.2018 19:30:12
One of my #heroes #DavidAttenborough .
.
.
#Repost @thephotosociety (@get_repost
One of my #heroes#DavidAttenborough . . . #Repost@thephotosociety (@get_repost) ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough ‘Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#bbc#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
06.06.2018 19:44:57
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talkin
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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough ‘Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#bbc#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
06.06.2018 12:30:29
For #WorldEnvironmentDay a 
#Repost from @everydayextinction, very close to my c
For #WorldEnvironmentDay a #Repost from @everydayextinction, very close to my current ‘home’ @lewa_wildlife. 💚 ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#bbc#blackrhino#northernkenya#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
06.06.2018 09:40:36
These beautiful photographs by @chancellordavid are from a recent story he worke
These beautiful photographs by @chancellordavid are from a recent story he worked on in northern Kenya with Jeneria from @ewasolions. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘I’ve known this extraordinary man for a long while now, followed his progress from a young man into an extraordinary warrior and a beautiful human being. He’s one of the finest examples of a true conservationist that I’ve ever come across. He is as I like to say, like a stick of rock, what you see on the outside simply goes right through the centre of the entire rock. Two days ago Letoiye, pictured here with Jeneria, and his team suspected that a lioness had been invited (Nadala) and yesterday they tracked her for 8 hours on foot. They found her limping, but she can walk. It appears she has been shot. I learnt last night that they are staying with the lioness eating wild fruit, and honey from nearby hives until the vet from KWS (Kenya Wildlife Services) arrives to assess the lion. My thoughts are always with these Moran, but now more than ever so. Extraordinary warriors, wonderful precious humans, great conservationists and guardians of the planet.’
06.06.2018 08:07:21
These beautiful photographs by @chancellordavid are from a recent story he worke
These beautiful photographs by @chancellordavid are from a recent story he worked on in northern Kenya with Jeneria from @ewasolions. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘I’ve known this extraordinary man for a long while now, followed his progress from a young man into an extraordinary warrior and a beautiful human being. He’s one of the finest examples of a true conservationist that I’ve ever come across. He is as I like to say, like a stick of rock, what you see on the outside simply goes right through the centre of the entire rock. Two days ago Letoiye, pictured here with Jeneria, and his team suspected that a lioness had been invited (Nadala) and yesterday they tracked her for 8 hours on foot. They found her limping, but she can walk. It appears she has been shot. I learnt last night that they are staying with the lioness eating wild fruit, and honey from nearby hives until the vet from KWS (Kenya Wildlife Services) arrives to assess the lion. My thoughts are always with these Moran, but now more than ever so. Extraordinary warriors, wonderful precious humans, great conservationists and guardians of the planet.’
06.06.2018 08:07:06
These beautiful photographs by @chancellordavid are from a recent story he worke
These beautiful photographs by @chancellordavid are from a recent story he worked on in northern Kenya with Jeneria from @ewasolions. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘I’ve known this extraordinary man for a long while now, followed his progress from a young man into an extraordinary warrior and a beautiful human being. He’s one of the finest examples of a true conservationist that I’ve ever come across. He is as I like to say, like a stick of rock, what you see on the outside simply goes right through the centre of the entire rock. Two days ago Letoiye, pictured here with Jeneria, and his team suspected that a lioness had been invited (Nadala) and yesterday they tracked her for 8 hours on foot. They found her limping, but she can walk. It appears she has been shot. I learnt last night that they are staying with the lioness eating wild fruit, and honey from nearby hives until the vet from KWS (Kenya Wildlife Services) arrives to assess the lion. My thoughts are always with these Moran, but now more than ever so. Extraordinary warriors, wonderful precious humans, great conservationists and guardians of the planet.’
06.06.2018 08:06:14
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talkin
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#bbc#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction#Repost@everydayextinction with @insta.save.repost • • •
05.06.2018 16:27:04
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talkin
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#davidattenborough#bbc#blackrhino#northernkenya#conserving#conservation#withbutterfliesandwarriors#northernkenya#fightingextinction
05.06.2018 16:19:45
This is from a story I did recently in northern Kenya with Jeneria from @ewasoli
This is from a story I did recently in northern Kenya with Jeneria from @ewasolions - I’ve known this extraordinary man for a long while now, followed his progress from a young man into an extraordinary warrior and a beautiful human being. He’s one of the finest examples of a true conservationist that I’ve ever come across. He is as I like to say, like a stick of rock, what you see on the outside simply goes right through the centre of the entire rock. Two days ago Letoiye, pictured here with Jeneria, and his team suspected that a lioness had been invited (Nadala) and yesterday they tracked her for 8 hours on foot. They found her limping, but she can walk. It appears she has been shot. I learnt last night that they are staying with the lioness eating wild fruit, and honey from nearby hives until the vet from KWS (Kenya Wildlife Services) arrives to assess the lion. My thoughts are always with these Moran, but now more than ever so. Extraordinary warriors, wonderful precious humans, great conservationists and guardians of the planet, stay safe -#withbutterfliesandwarriors - I’ll update later on developments here. Follow there work @ewasolions and more on this story here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety@everydayextinction#conserving#conservation#carnivore#lion#lionrecovery#northernkenya#kenya@magazinegeo#samburu 💚
26.05.2018 06:56:24
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - lmuget, northern Kenya - Yeste
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - lmuget, northern Kenya - Yesterday I gave the second outreach talk by Everyday Extinction @everydayextinction contributors at ZSL London Zoo @zsllondonzoo - One of @everydayextinction initial aims was to start to help increase dialogue between image makers and other practitioners working in the field of conservation, in this case the dedicated scientists and operators of the world’s oldest scientific zoo. Many thanks to the staff at ZSL for helping to make this happen. If you’re not following the feed yet, learn more and follow our updates @everydayextinction - it’s also important not to forget the promise I made to those who I’m currently working with on the second stage of this long term project here in northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors - and that’s to also share this work with them so that they may share in the importance of their actions and decisions. The effects of these decisions are no longer limited to the communities and geographic locations where they originate, but have a bearing on us all. In essence the butterfly effect from those who are known as the ‘butterfly people’ by all who have the immense privilege to be amongst these proud, extraordinary human beings. To see more of this work follow my journey here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and of course always @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conservation#conserving#fightingextinction#kenya#samburu#northernkenya - a footnote here - I rely on an incredibly small, but very tight group of individuals to support me in this work logistically, @kinetic_six are very much at the front of my mind today. They supply me with seamless comms whilst in the field, but they also, and more importantly supply nearly all of those rangers who put their lives on the line to protect the planets wildlife with the ability to communicate, stay safe, and call for help. My heart today is with those 6 souls in the DRC who have lost their lives, and loved ones, in line of duty defending wildlife today -Rest in Peace - @kinetic_six thank you for all you do, you are unsung and should be loudly heard 👍🏿👍🏼🙏🏼
10.04.2018 21:30:23
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - lmuget, northern Kenya - Yeste
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - lmuget, northern Kenya - Yesterday I gave the second outreach talk by Everyday Extinction @everydayextinction contributors at ZSL London Zoo @zsllondonzoo - One of @everydayextinction initial aims was to start to help increase dialogue between image makers and other practitioners working in the field of conservation, in this case the dedicated scientists and operators of the world's oldest scientific zoo. Many thanks to the staff at ZSL for helping to make this happen. If you're not following the feed yet, learn more and follow our updates @everydayextinction - it’s also important not to forget the promise I made to those who I’m currently working with on the second stage of this long term project here in northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors - and that’s to also share this work with them so that they may share in the importance of their actions and decisions. The effects of these decisions are no longer limited to the communities and geographic locations where they originate, but have a bearing on us all. In essence the butterfly effect from those who are known as the ‘butterfly people’ by all who have the immense privilege to be amongst these proud, extraordinary human beings. To see more of this work follow my journey here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and of course always @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conservation#conserving#fightingextinction#kenya#samburu#northernkenya - a footnote here - I rely on an incredibly small, but very tight group of individuals to support me in this work logistically, @kinetic_six are very much at the front of my mind today. They supply me with seamless comms whilst in the field, but they also, and more importantly supply nearly all of those rangers who put their lives on the line to protect the planets wildlife with the ability to communicate, stay safe, and call for help. My heart today is with those 6 souls in the DRC who have lost their lives, and loved ones, in line of duty defending wildlife today -Rest in Peace - @kinetic_six thank you for all you do, you are unsung and should be loudly heard 👍🏿👍🏼🙏🏼
10.04.2018 12:01:15
Very privileged to have had the opportunity today to present work and projects f
Very privileged to have had the opportunity today to present work and projects from northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors to @ZSL londonzoo and share more about the amazing work of @everydayextinction - thanks @sean_gallagher_photo for your utterly stunning work and extraordinary attention to detail, it doesn’t go unnoticed I can assure you - to see more of the work of all those contributing follow @everydayextinction - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @natgeo and @thephotosociety#fightingextinction This drawing is of Jenny, the first orangutang to be shown at London Zoo. She arrived on 25 November 1837, purchased from a Mr Moss for £150. She was put in the specially heated Giraffe House and soon attracted excited crowds of people. On 28 March 1838, Charles Darwin came to the Zoo to see Jenny. It was his first sight of an ape. Jenny made a profound impression on Darwin. Leading him to write in his notebook: “Let man visit Ouranoutang in domestication, hear expressive whine, see its intelligence when spoken [to]; as if it understands every word said - see its affection. - to those it knew. - see its passion & rage, sulkiness, & very actions of despair; ... and then let him boast of his proud preeminence ... Man in his arrogance thinks himself a great work, worthy the interposition of a deity. More humble and I believe true to consider him created from animals.” Darwin visited Jenny two more times, noting that she was "astonished beyond measure" when she saw her reflection in a mirror. @zsllondonzoo@everydayextinction#conserving#conservation#everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors
09.04.2018 17:37:43
Transportando elefantes 
#Repost @thephotosociety with @get_repost
・・・
Photograp
22 2
Transportando elefantes #Repost@thephotosociety with @get_repost ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - relocating elephants from Lewa/Borana landscape northern Kenya, to Tsavo - these are persistent offenders, breaking fences and raiding adjoining farms. This translocation is designed to relocate specific elephants, in this case 9 in total, to areas less prevalent to occurrences of conflict. This is by no means perfect, however, it’s a compromise given the alternative would almost certainly be retaliatory attacks from those subject to the elephants raids. What’s interesting here is the shear number of people who given the opportunity; and in this case as the transfer from truck to trailer happened outside of the conservancies this was available to the general public, who turn out to simply see the wildlife that they often live alongside, rarely see, and generally derive little benefit from. We have to allow those who share their lands to not only share in the benefits derived from them, but also understand and appreciate the issues surrounding their very presence on these lands. Big shout out here to all involved in this complex operation, particularly @kenyawildlifeservice@lewa_wildlife@boranaconservancy@savetheelephants without whose support and expertise this wouldn’t have been possible. Not ideal, but given the inevitable alternative a good result for these elephants currently - I’ll keep up to date on how they settle in at Tsavo follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#elephant#africa#kenya
08.04.2018 05:09:14
@Regrann from @thephotosociety: Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid
@Regrann from @thephotosociety: Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - relocating elephants from Lewa/Borana landscape northern Kenya, to Tsavo - these are persistent offenders, breaking fences and raiding adjoining farms. This translocation is designed to relocate specific elephants, in this case 9 in total, to areas less prevalent to occurrences of conflict. This is by no means perfect, however, it’s a compromise given the alternative would almost certainly be retaliatory attacks from those subject to the elephants raids. What’s interesting here is the shear number of people who given the opportunity; and in this case as the transfer from truck to trailer happened outside of the conservancies this was available to the general public, who turn out to simply see the wildlife that they often live alongside, rarely see, and generally derive little benefit from. We have to allow those who share their lands to not only share in the benefits derived from them, but also understand and appreciate the issues surrounding their very presence on these lands. Big shout out here to all involved in this complex operation, particularly @kenyawildlifeservice@lewa_wildlife@boranaconservancy@savetheelephants without whose support and expertise this wouldn’t have been possible. Not ideal, but given the inevitable alternative a good result for these elephants currently - I’ll keep up to date on how they settle in at Tsavo follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#elephant#africa#kenya
08.04.2018 04:47:22
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - relocating elephants from Lewa
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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - relocating elephants from Lewa/Borana landscape northern Kenya, to Tsavo - these are persistent offenders, breaking fences and raiding adjoining farms. This translocation is designed to relocate specific elephants, in this case 9 in total, to areas less prevalent to occurrences of conflict. This is by no means perfect, however, it’s a compromise given the alternative would almost certainly be retaliatory attacks from those subject to the elephants raids. What’s interesting here is the shear number of people who given the opportunity; and in this case as the transfer from truck to trailer happened outside of the conservancies this was available to the general public, who turn out to simply see the wildlife that they often live alongside, rarely see, and generally derive little benefit from. We have to allow those who share their lands to not only share in the benefits derived from them, but also understand and appreciate the issues surrounding their very presence on these lands. Big shout out here to all involved in this complex operation, particularly @kenyawildlifeservice@lewa_wildlife@boranaconservancy@savetheelephants without whose support and expertise this wouldn’t have been possible. Not ideal, but given the inevitable alternative a good result for these elephants currently - I’ll keep up to date on how they settle in at Tsavo follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#elephant#africa#kenya
08.04.2018 02:37:04
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - relocating elephants from Lewa
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - relocating elephants from Lewa/Borana landscape northern Kenya, to Tsavo - these are persistent offenders, breaking fences and raiding adjoining farms. This translocation is designed to relocate specific elephants, in this case 9 in total, to areas less prevalent to occurrences of conflict. This is by no means perfect, however, it’s a compromise given the alternative would almost certainly be retaliatory attacks from those subject to the elephants raids. What’s interesting here is the shear number of people who given the opportunity; and in this case as the transfer from truck to trailer happened outside of the conservancies this was available to the general public, who turn out to simply see the wildlife that they often live alongside, rarely see, and generally derive little benefit from. We have to allow those who share their lands to not only share in the benefits derived from them, but also understand and appreciate the issues surrounding their very presence on these lands. Big shout out here to all involved in this complex operation, particularly @kenyawildlifeservice@lewa_wildlife@boranaconservancy@savetheelephants without whose support and expertise this wouldn’t have been possible. Not ideal, but given the inevitable alternative a good result for these elephants currently - I’ll keep up to date on how they settle in at Tsavo follow me here @chancellordavid@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#elephant#africa#kenya
05.04.2018 18:17:04
@chancellordavid is shortlisted for the @capprize - The Contemporary African Pho
@chancellordavid is shortlisted for the @capprize - The Contemporary African Photography Prize - with his series ‘With Butterflies and Warriors’!
04.04.2018 08:05:42
@chancellordavid is shortlisted for the @capprize - The Contemporary African Pho
@chancellordavid is shortlisted for the @capprize - The Contemporary African Photography Prize - with his series ‘With Butterflies and Warriors’!
04.04.2018 08:05:28
@chancellordavid is shortlisted for the @capprize - The Contemporary African Pho
@chancellordavid is shortlisted for the @capprize - The Contemporary African Photography Prize - with his series ‘With Butterflies and Warriors’!
04.04.2018 08:05:10
Samburu moran (warriors) gathering at sunset - northern Kenya #withbutterfliesan
03.04.2018 20:05:18
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Ivory room # I, Nairobi, Kenya
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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Ivory room # I, Nairobi, Kenya from the series ‘with butterflies, and warriors’ - Delighted to hear from Tusk @tusk_org That today the UK Government has confirmed that it will ban ivory sales to protect the future of elephants in Africa and Asia. The robust measures being introduced will make the ban the toughest in Europe and one of the toughest in the world. The ban will ensure there is no value for modern day ivory and the tusks of recently poached elephants can not enter the UK market. It will be introduced with primary legislation ahead of the UK Government hosting the fourth international conference on the illegal wildlife trade, which returns to London in October for the first time since they instigated the first such gathering of global leaders in 2014. The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be worth in the region of $20billion per annum – making it the fourth largest criminal activity after drugs, arms and human trafficking. Africa’s elephant populations have crashed by 70% from 1.3m in 1979 to less than 400,000 today. Current data suggests that 20,000 elephants are being killed each year for their ivory. Thanking @tusk_org@bornfreefoundation@dswfwildlife@stop.ivory@zsllondonzoo@savetheelephants@r.e.s.c.u.e for their tireless work on this subject. #withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#notrade#ivory#elephant - for more work and projects follow me here and @natgeo@thephotosociety@everydayextinction 👍🏿👍🏼🙏🏼🐘💚
03.04.2018 18:30:29
sunrise over the samburu, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors
sunrise over the samburu, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors...more
03.04.2018 15:02:40
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Ivory room # I, Nairobi, Kenya
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Ivory room # I, Nairobi, Kenya from the series ‘with butterflies, and warriors’ - Delighted to hear from Tusk @tusk_org that today the UK Government has confirmed that it will ban ivory sales to protect the future of elephants in Africa and Asia. The robust measures being introduced will make the ban the toughest in Europe and one of the toughest in the world. The ban will ensure there is no value for modern day ivory and the tusks of recently poached elephants can not enter the UK market. It will be introduced with primary legislation ahead of the UK Government hosting the fourth international conference on the illegal wildlife trade, which returns to London in October for the first time since they instigated the first such gathering of global leaders in 2014. The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be worth in the region of $20billion per annum – making it the fourth largest criminal activity after drugs, arms and human trafficking. Africa’s elephant populations have crashed by 70% from 1.3m in 1979 to less than 400,000 today. Current data suggests that 20,000 elephants are being killed each year for their ivory. Thanking @tusk_org@bornfreefoundation@dswfwildlife@stop.ivory@zsllondonzoo@savetheelephants@r.e.s.c.u.e for their tireless work on this subject. #withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#notrade#ivory#elephant - for more work and projects follow me here and @natgeo@thephotosociety@everydayextinction 👍🏿👍🏼🙏🏼🐘💚
03.04.2018 11:35:40
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - dry lagga and elephants skin d
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - dry lagga and elephants skin detail, northern Kenya - The northern rangelands of Kenya are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of climate change; both drought and flood can have devastating effects on people and wildlife, thus exacerbating the possibility of human wildlife conflict as pastoralists and their livestock compete with wildlife for diminishing resources - #withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#africa#kenya#northernkenya#nopoaching#notrade#wildlife#elephant#ivory#rhino@natgeo@thephotosociety and @everydayextinction
02.04.2018 10:48:01
Sitting around the fire drinking milky tea with the herders - this huge herd of
Sitting around the fire drinking milky tea with the herders - this huge herd of 200+ camels will leave the protection of the thorn boma shortly and spend the day grazing on the rangelands here in northern Kenya - with the pastoralists, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#pastoralists#northernkenya#kenya#camel#carnivores@ewasolions@thephotosociety@natgeo and @everydayextinction
01.04.2018 13:22:54
Pastoralists in this region of northern Kenya ensure livestock, in this case a h
Pastoralists in this region of northern Kenya ensure livestock, in this case a herd of over 200 camel, are safely protected from carnivores after dusk, particularly lion and leopard, by using boma’s constructed from thorn trees. The last line of defence against lion, a hump to hide behind - northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#conservation#pastoralists#northernkenya#kenya
01.04.2018 12:54:02
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - reticulated giraffe, samburu n
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - reticulated giraffe, samburu national park, northern Kenya - As recently as the turn of the millennium it’s estimated that the population of these extraordinary quirky creatures was some 36,000 - today, they are thought to number fewer than 25% of that and almost all are restricted to the north-east of Kenya. The northern rangelands are subject to frequent and prolonged periods of drought. The human population is growing, swollen by refugees from recent conflicts in Somalia and South Sudan. These are nomadic pastoralists, dependent on their cattle, camels, sheep and goats, and subject to poverty, hunger and sometimes starvation. Automatic weapons have become widespread and its increasingly difficult to provide effective administration over such a vast and remote area as this. This combination of insecurity and deprivation has serious implications for many species of wildlife and, in particular, for reticulated giraffes, which are hunted preferentially when people are forced to adopt coping strategies in the face of threats to their own survival. It’s surprisingly easy to miss one as you drive through the wonderful landscape of this region, and appalling to think that if the decline continues at this rate they may well not be there to miss in the very near future - As an end note, they kind of remind me of the Samburu dressed in their beautiful clothes, strong, regal, with an air of grace and poise. It always seems impossible to me for the Samburu to disappear in the bush; I often find myself stoically staring at them in order to bear witness to the very act of vanishing, and then they’re gone ! Damn !! Missed it again...off I go to find another one, hopefully 💚#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#kenya#africa#conservation#giraffe#reticulatedgiraffe#samburu#northernkenya@everydayextinction@natgeo@thephotosociety
31.03.2018 18:00:26
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - reticulated giraffe, samburu n
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - reticulated giraffe, samburu national park, northern Kenya - As recently as the turn of the millennium it’s estimated that the population of these extraordinary quirky creatures was some 36,000 - today, they are thought to number fewer than 25% of that and almost all are restricted to the north-east of Kenya. The northern rangelands are subject to frequent and prolonged periods of drought. The human population is growing, swollen by refugees from recent conflicts in Somalia and South Sudan. These are nomadic pastoralists, dependent on their cattle, camels, sheep and goats, and subject to poverty, hunger and sometimes starvation. Automatic weapons have become widespread and its increasingly difficult to provide effective administration over such a vast and remote area as this. This combination of insecurity and deprivation has serious implications for many species of wildlife and, in particular, for reticulated giraffes, which are hunted preferentially when people are forced to adopt coping strategies in the face of threats to their own survival. It’s surprisingly easy to miss one as you drive through the wonderful landscape of this region, and appalling to think that if the decline continues at this rate they may well not be there to miss in the very near future - As an end note, they kind of remind me of the Samburu dressed in their beautiful clothes, strong, regal, with an air of grace and poise. It always seems impossible to me for the Samburu to disappear in the bush; I often find myself stoically staring at them in order to bear witness to the very act of vanishing, and then they’re gone ! Damn !! Missed it again...off I go to find another one, hopefully 💚#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#kenya#africa#conservation#giraffe#reticulatedgiraffe#samburu#northernkenya@everydayextinction@natgeo@thephotosociety
30.03.2018 18:00:00
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - reticulated giraffe, samburu n
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - reticulated giraffe, samburu national park, northern Kenya - As recently as the turn of the millennium it’s estimated that the population of these extraordinary quirky creatures was some 36,000 - today, they are thought to number fewer than 25% of that and almost all are restricted to the north-east of Kenya. The northern rangelands are subject to frequent and prolonged periods of drought. The human population is growing, swollen by refugees from recent conflicts in Somalia and South Sudan. These are nomadic pastoralists, dependent on their cattle, camels, sheep and goats, and subject to poverty, hunger and sometimes starvation. Automatic weapons have become widespread and its increasingly difficult to provide effective administration over such a vast and remote area as this. This combination of insecurity and deprivation has serious implications for many species of wildlife and, in particular, for reticulated giraffes, which are hunted preferentially when people are forced to adopt coping strategies in the face of threats to their own survival. It’s surprisingly easy to miss one as you drive through the wonderful landscape of this region, and appalling to think that if the decline continues at this rate they may well not be there to miss in the very near future - As an end note, they kind of remind me of the Samburu dressed in their beautiful clothes, strong, regal, with an air of grace and poise. It always seems impossible to me for the Samburu to disappear in the bush; I often find myself stoically staring at them in order to bear witness to the very act of vanishing, and then they’re gone ! Damn !! Missed it again...off I go to find another one, hopefully 💚#withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#kenya#africa#conservation#giraffe#reticulatedgiraffe#samburu#northernkenya@everydayextinction@natgeo@thephotosociety
30.03.2018 17:53:39
A Samburu moran (warrior) shelters from the rains in a schoolroom, northern Keny
A Samburu moran (warrior) shelters from the rains in a schoolroom, northern Kenya. #withbutterfliesandwarriors#conserving#kenya#conservation#samburu#warriors
29.03.2018 11:51:24
landcruiser landscape, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors
landcruiser landscape, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors...more
28.03.2018 14:03:44
camels fighting, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors
camels fighting, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors...more
27.03.2018 15:54:23
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