Instagram tag AfricanParks

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Moments before the hunt
Moments before the hunt...more
17.07.2018 13:36:50
2 bateleurs snapped in the Kruger. I got the exposure horribly wrong but I’ve re
2 bateleurs snapped in the Kruger. I got the exposure horribly wrong but I’ve rescued it as best I can in Lightroom . . . . #wildlife#wildlifephotography#wild#instadaily#safari#photooftheday#photography#photosafari#canon#africa#instaanimal#africanparks#africa#southafrica#kruger#birdsofprey#bateleur
16.07.2018 20:02:07
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficul
#Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
16.07.2018 16:25:59
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Brilliant (and adorably fluffy!) news all the way from Liwonde National Park in
Brilliant (and adorably fluffy!) news all the way from Liwonde National Park in Malawi. The best kind of news for a Monday! #Repost@africanparksnetwork with @get_repost ・・・ Watch: We’ve had a rare sighting of the first wild cheetah cubs to the born in Malawi in 20 years - and are pleased to share that they are doing well! Although it is uncommon to catch a glimpse of them at such a young age, as mum keeps them well hidden and away from predators, we were lucky enough capture these furballs on camera. African Parks and the @endangeredwildlifetrust (EWT) made history in May 2017, when a small founder population of cheetahs was successfully relocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, restoring the population of this threatened species at least 20 years after its extinction in the country. The birth of these four cubs, the first in the wild in Malawi in over 20 years, is a conservation milestone, and a positive indicator of how these cheetahs have adapted to their new home. The cheetah population in Liwonde, although small, has grown in just the last year to at least 15, and is part of a larger predator-restoration project for the park, and region. Keep up to date with this remarkable story and other exciting advancements by signing up for updates by clicking the link in our bio. #AfricanParks#BigCats#Liwonde#Malawi#naturesreturn#wildlife
16.07.2018 14:08:15
Click on the @natgeowild icon today to follow cameramen @alexbraczkowski and @st
Click on the @natgeowild icon today to follow cameramen @alexbraczkowski and @stevewinterphoto documenting the historic rhino translocation by @africanparksnetwork from South Africa to @zakouma_national_park. This is the first time rhinos will be in Chad after a 40 year absence and an unprecedented collaboration between @sanparks@africanparksnetwork, the governments of Chad and South Africa! This is a wonderful story of hope in a time when rhinos are under fire by poachers across Africa! Follow @natgeowild and @africanparksnetwork for more incredible animal stories! . . . . . #rhino#rhinoceros#conservation#wildlife#beauty#comeback#chad#southafrica#sanparks#herbivore#natgeowild#africanparks . . . . . #czgirls#beautygirlz#beachday
16.07.2018 04:53:12
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Regrann from @natgeo -  @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

There are nine sub-s
6 0
Regrann from @natgeo - @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. @africanparksnetwork@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – the abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. @natgeocreative#AfricanParks - #regrann
16.07.2018 01:15:17
#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
・・・
Watch: We’ve had a rare sighti
#Repost@africanparksnetwork with @get_repost ・・・ Watch: We’ve had a rare sighting of the first wild cheetah cubs to the born in Malawi in 20 years - and are pleased to share that they are doing well! Although it is uncommon to catch a glimpse of them at such a young age, as mum keeps them well hidden and away from predators, we were lucky enough capture these furballs on camera. African Parks and the @endangeredwildlifetrust (EWT) made history in May 2017, when a small founder population of cheetahs was successfully relocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, restoring the population of this threatened species at least 20 years after its extinction in the country. The birth of these four cubs, the first in the wild in Malawi in over 20 years, is a conservation milestone, and a positive indicator of how these cheetahs have adapted to their new home. The cheetah population in Liwonde, although small, has grown in just the last year to at least 15, and is part of a larger predator-restoration project for the park, and region. Keep up to date with this remarkable story and other exciting advancements by signing up for updates by clicking the link in our bio. #AfricanParks#BigCats#Liwonde#Malawi#naturesreturn#wildlife
15.07.2018 23:46:53
A storm put Chinko without internet for one week. Some liked the calm and quiet,
A storm put Chinko without internet for one week. Some liked the calm and quiet, others were less thrilled but everyone agreed on one thing: the storm was spectacular. Menacing and beautiful at the same time, nature was showing off. 📷 @david.chinko#chinko#inthebush#rainyseason#calmbeforethestorm#conservation#wildlife#africanparks#centralafricanrepublic
15.07.2018 18:32:17
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#Repost @leonardodicaprio
• • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wil
#Repost@leonardodicaprio • • • #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi#animals#conservation#elephant#africa#PlanetB#nature
15.07.2018 13:07:11
This pano almost shows the scale of the landscape riding around in Nyika Nationa
This pano almost shows the scale of the landscape riding around in Nyika National Park. The valley you can see on the right of the shot is looking 5000 feet down and out into the Rift Valley and Luwanga reserve in Zambia. The riding was amazing, long open tracks winding through the rolling hills. We did 130 km never seeing another person. Tons of red buck, kudu, brush buck and zebra.
15.07.2018 07:52:04
#Repost @stevewinterphoto (@get_repost)
・・・
Look at the @africanparksnetwork Zak
#Repost@stevewinterphoto (@get_repost) ・・・ Look at the @africanparksnetwork Zakouma National Park from the air! My assistant @alexbraczkowski and I flew this area for two weeks with pilot Jerome Hugonot and we spotted everything from tiang, hartebeest, lions and crowned cranes from a few hundred feet! We did this in a small Cessna with its doors removed. @zakouma_national_park is recovering after losing most of its elephants a decade ago! Now elephants are breeding for the first time in over a decade. With over 100 000 elephants killed over the past 8 years in Africa we need conservation successes. @africanparksnetwork is leading the way so give them a follow to see more of their incredible work. Song by Petit Biscuit. . . . . . @africanparksnetwork@taylorswift@alexbraczkowski@reddigitalcinema@litragear#zakouma#african#northafrica#elephants#conservation#wildlife#startwith1thing#wildaid#africanparks#shotonred#beauty
14.07.2018 20:31:31
#Repost @leonardodicaprio
• • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wil
#Repost@leonardodicaprio • • • #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
14.07.2018 14:52:21
#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

There a
#Repost@natgeo with @get_repost ・・・ @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. @africanparksnetwork@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – the abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. @natgeocreative#AfricanParks
14.07.2018 14:13:47
Here at Liuwa Plain National Park community engagement is a vital aspect of park
Here at Liuwa Plain National Park community engagement is a vital aspect of park management. Seen here is area chief - or Silalo Induna - Induna Mundandwe addressing Zambian Members of parliament on how tourism and African Parks community initiatives have positively impacted his people. The success of Liuwa Plain National Park depends on the support of the areas traditional leaders. @africanparksnetwork@timeandtideafrica#liuwaplainnationalpark#zambia#africa#africanparks#conservation#community
14.07.2018 07:47:38
#Repost @leonardodicaprio with @get_repost
・・・
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork:
#Repost@leonardodicaprio with @get_repost ・・・ #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 15:04:24
E D U C A T I O N 💪🏾
____________________
Education is crucial for so many thing
E D U C A T I O N 💪🏾 ____________________ Education is crucial for so many things - for conservation, for breaking the poverty cycle, and for empowering women. While the basics remain of utmost importance, exposing children to new ideas and critical thinking is as well - but since many schools in developing countries tend to be religiously inclined, and political systems often leaning towards the authoritarian, that’s usually more of a challenge. So seeing it in practice - girls being told that they should dream big, and that they can fulfill those dreams - is pretty incredible. Photo from @zakouma_national_park, managed by @africanparksnetwork. 🇹🇩 . . . . . . . . . . #educationrocks#communityschool#africanportraits#african_portraits#childrenarethefuture#africanparks#everydayextinction#everydayafrica#tchad#chad#zakouma#mobileschool
13.07.2018 15:00:43
Il commercio dell'avorio e la deforestazione stanno portando l'elefante all'esti
Il commercio dell'avorio e la deforestazione stanno portando l'elefante all'estinzione. Si calcola che circa 20.000 elefanti africani siano uccisi dai bracconieri ogni anno. Quando nel 1989 venne chiuso il mercato internazionale dell’avorio si sperò che finalmente questa tratta incivile potesse essere fermata; purtroppo si trattò solo di una pausa. Infatti, nel 2007, 4 Paesi africani (Sudafrica, Namibia, Botswana e Zimbabwe) ottennero dalla Cites, l’organizzazione che regola il mercato mondiale dei prodotti di specie a rischio, la possibilità di vendere alla Cina l’avorio cosiddetto “legale”, ovvero gli stock accumulati durante i vent’anni della moratoria. Questo permesso diede il via libero ai bracconieri e allo sviluppo di un mercato nero dell’avorio, oggi tra le cause principali della scomparsa di questo antico animale. Lo stesso vale per l’Asia ma con una piccola differenza: sono solo gli elefanti maschi ad avere le zanne d’avorio. La loro caccia e conseguente abbattimento genera anche un’alterazione demografica nelle popolazioni di elefanti. In alcune riserve è rimasto solo un maschio adulto per ogni cento femmine, e di conseguenza meno di un terzo delle femmine adulte è accompagnata da un piccolo. Negli ultimi anni si è aggiunto un’ulteriore forma di bracconaggio, molto più devastante e organizzata, legata alle guerriglie e bande armate che utilizzano strumenti tecnologici e armi micidiali per sterminare gli elefanti e finanziare con la vendita dell’avorio le guerre locali. La seconda minaccia è la deforestazione. Gran parte degli habitat degli elefanti si estende ancora al di fuori delle aree protette, ma il rapido aumento della popolazione umana e l’estensione dell’agricoltura rendono ogni anno più inagibili zone appartenute da sempre a questi splendidi mammiferi che ora sono in via di estinzione. #elephant#naturesreturn#africanparks#savetheanimals#asiananimals#africananimals
13.07.2018 13:20:11
Help this page out by checking out our amazing products with original artwork by
Help this page out by checking out our amazing products with original artwork by artist @michael_volpicelli ( @masterwork_artistry ) printed upon them. Some stuff includes things like this tiger image as well as many others, printed on all kinds of cool stuffs! Click the link in the bio to see more! . . . . . #tigertattoo#nature#wildlife#wildlifephotography#zimparks#africanparks#wildllifeconservation#africananimals#protectourwildlife#victoriafalls#zambeziriver#elephant#vicfalls#bigcats#naturephotography#tigers#instatravel#capturethewild#natgeo#explore#saveourtigers#instagood
13.07.2018 12:15:18
Regrann from @leonardodicaprio -  #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota W
Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi ⠀ - #regrann
13.07.2018 12:07:17
#Repost @cookingforconservation with @get_repost
・・・
Thank you @africanparksnetw
#Repost@cookingforconservation with @get_repost ・・・ Thank you @africanparksnetwork for this post - 🙏 @kickstarter recently named @cookingforconservation as one of their “projects we love” - and we are excited to tell you why! This long-awaited and unique book is full of recipes honed over years of gourmet cooking in the bush, accompanied by stories straight from the plains of @zakouma_national_park in Chad (along with a foreword by @sophy_roberts). Once the book is printed, the proceeds from sales will be donated to African Parks to help our conservation efforts on the African continent. Supporters of a certain level of the campaign will have the opportunity to experience the park first hand, and dine under the stars in one of the most intriguing national parks in Africa. Jamie Sparks, the author and culinary expert, will also be your personal chef for the week, cooking recipes from her cookbook which she has mastered over the years both in Zakouma and other far-off places. Additional rewards include a limited edition Greg Du Toit print, along with photos from @kyledenobrega and @mlorentz23, as well as other safari experiences in different places in Africa. Zakouma is a thriving, conservation success story in one of the most unlikely corners of the planet where elephants and other species are on the rise, and where black rhinos were just reintroduced in May. To find out more on how you can support our work by backing this book, please visit the link in our bio. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography#AfricanParks#Zakouma#Chad#Cookingforconservation
13.07.2018 10:37:10
Repost from @africanparksnetwork for a project I Love too! @kickstarter recently
Repost from @africanparksnetwork for a project I Love too! @kickstarter recently named @cookingforconservation as one of their “projects we love” - and we are excited to tell you why! This long-awaited and unique book is full of recipes honed over years of gourmet cooking in the bush, accompanied by stories straight from the plains of @zakouma_national_park in Chad (along with a foreword by @sophy_roberts). Once the book is printed, the proceeds from sales will be donated to African Parks to help our conservation efforts on the African continent. Supporters of a certain level of the campaign will have the opportunity to experience the park first hand, and dine under the stars in one of the most intriguing national parks in Africa. Jamie Sparks, the author and culinary expert, will also be your personal chef for the week, cooking recipes from her cookbook which she has mastered over the years both in Zakouma and other far-off places. Additional rewards include a limited edition Greg Du Toit print, along with photos from @kyledenobrega and @mlorentz23, as well as other safari experiences in different places in Africa. Zakouma is a thriving, conservation success story in one of the most unlikely corners of the planet where elephants and other species are on the rise, and where black rhinos were just reintroduced in May. To find out more on how you can support our work by backing this book, please visit the link in our bio. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography#AfricanParks#Zakouma#Chad#Cookingforconservation
13.07.2018 07:42:31
Thank you @africanparksnetwork for this post - 🙏 @kickstarter recently named @co
Thank you @africanparksnetwork for this post - 🙏 @kickstarter recently named @cookingforconservation as one of their “projects we love” - and we are excited to tell you why! This long-awaited and unique book is full of recipes honed over years of gourmet cooking in the bush, accompanied by stories straight from the plains of @zakouma_national_park in Chad (along with a foreword by @sophy_roberts). Once the book is printed, the proceeds from sales will be donated to African Parks to help our conservation efforts on the African continent. Supporters of a certain level of the campaign will have the opportunity to experience the park first hand, and dine under the stars in one of the most intriguing national parks in Africa. Jamie Sparks, the author and culinary expert, will also be your personal chef for the week, cooking recipes from her cookbook which she has mastered over the years both in Zakouma and other far-off places. Additional rewards include a limited edition Greg Du Toit print, along with photos from @kyledenobrega and @mlorentz23, as well as other safari experiences in different places in Africa. Zakouma is a thriving, conservation success story in one of the most unlikely corners of the planet where elephants and other species are on the rise, and where black rhinos were just reintroduced in May. To find out more on how you can support our work by backing this book, please visit the link in our bio. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography#AfricanParks#Zakouma#Chad#Cookingforconservation
13.07.2018 07:40:14
#Repost @leonardodicaprio
• • • • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota
#Repost@leonardodicaprio • • • • • #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 05:44:26
@leonardodicaprio
• • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Re
@leonardodicaprio • • • #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi#leonardodicaprio
13.07.2018 05:21:19
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficul
#Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi@nrt_kenya@lewa_wildlife@conservationorg@tusk_org@kenyawildlifeservice@sandiegozoo@natgeo@natgeocreative@thephotosociety#elephant#saveelephants#reteti#stoppoaching#kenya#northernkenya#magicalkenya#whiilovekenya#africa#everydayafrica#photojournalism#amivitale
13.07.2018 03:58:30
Regrann from @leonardodicaprio -  #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota W
Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 03:45:55
Regrann from @leonardodicaprio -  #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota W
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Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi ⠀ - #regrann
13.07.2018 03:30:21
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficul
#Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 03:00:09
repost via @instarepost20 from @leonardodicaprio #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwor
repost via @instarepost20 from @leonardodicaprio#Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 02:10:09
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficul
#Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 01:30:45
#Repost from @leonardodicaprio with @regram.app ... #Regram #RG @africanparksnet
#Repost from @leonardodicaprio with @regram.app ... #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 01:29:29
#Repost @leonardodicaprio
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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildl
#Repost@leonardodicaprio ・・・ #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi . .
13.07.2018 01:19:06
#Repost @leonardodicaprio with @get_repost
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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork:
#Repost@leonardodicaprio with @get_repost ・・・ #Regram#RG@africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer _________________________________________⠀ Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀ ⠀ #AfricanParks#AnnualReport#Restoration#NaturesReturn#Nkhotakota#Malawi
13.07.2018 01:12:22
#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

There are
#Repost@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. @africanparksnetwork@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – the abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. @natgeocreative#AfricanParks
13.07.2018 00:32:17
Conservation doesn’t have to exclude people. Repost from @africanparksnetwork ••
Conservation doesn’t have to exclude people. Repost from @africanparksnetwork ••• Almost 10,000 people live within @liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia, a park that has one of the oldest conservation histories in Africa. In the 19th Century, the King of Barotseland, Lubosi Lewanika, appointed his people to be the custodians of the park, where they maintain that sentiment today. Together, with local communities, the department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) and the Barotse Roya Establishment (BRE), we have been managing this precious and beautiful ecosystem since 2003, helping to find sustainable solutions so people and wildlife can share these historic plains. Liuwa is home to the second largest wildebeest migration on the planet, and harbours over 500 hyaena, cheetah, and a growing pride of lions. With the opening of King Lewanika Lodge just last year, Liuwa is being recognized as a place to visit. @nytimestravel highlighted Liuwa as one of the 52 places to visit in 2018, and @travelandleisure celebrated the lodge on its “2018 IT List”. We’re glad this park is getting the attention it deserves, as tourism is one way to help support both the people and wildlife who live here now, and provide for them all a brighter future. Photo by @mana_meadows#LiuwaPlain#Zambia#AfricanParks#peopleneednature#natureiscoming#restoration#52places#bucketlist@beautifuldestinations
12.07.2018 19:23:55
Almost 10,000 people live within @liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia, a park that
Almost 10,000 people live within @liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia, a park that has one of the oldest conservation histories in Africa. In the 19th Century, the King of Barotseland, Lubosi Lewanika, appointed his people to be the custodians of the park, where they maintain that sentiment today. Together, with local communities, the department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) and the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE), we have been managing this precious and beautiful ecosystem since 2003, helping to find sustainable solutions so people and wildlife can share these historic plains. Liuwa is home to the second largest wildebeest migration on the planet, and harbours over 500 hyaena, cheetah, and a growing pride of lions. With the opening of King Lewanika Lodge just last year, Liuwa is being recognized as a place to visit. @nytimestravel highlighted Liuwa as one of the 52 places to visit in 2018, and @travelandleisure celebrated the lodge on its “2018 IT List”. We’re glad this park is getting the attention it deserves, as tourism is one way to help support both the people and wildlife who live here now, and provide for them all a brighter future. Photo by @mana_meadows#LiuwaPlain#Zambia#AfricanParks#peopleneednature#natureiscoming#restoration#52places#bucketlist@beautifuldestinations
12.07.2018 19:13:16
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