Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) — NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker.
Next @NatGeo  Live! talk Nov 7th at The Playhouse Square Theatre, Cleveland, OH
30 November 2018 is when #bigcatweekend kicks off in the USA! Please tune in to
30 November 2018 is when #bigcatweekend kicks off in the USA! Please tune in to @natgeowild on the eve of the 2nd December to see our new show “Tree-Climbing Lions”. It tracks my adventures looking for incredible lions with @alexbraczkowski and @luke_ochse in southwestern Uganda. We’ll show you some incredible footage of lions balancing from the branches of 40 foot tall fig trees, wedged in the branches of cactus-like euphorbias and even hunting warthogs 🦁 Africa’s lions are in a state of decline across the majority of areas where they live. This is a unique story which tracks the lives of a unique population of lions with a culture of tree-climbing. It shows their behavior, their precarious existence in an increasingly human-dominated landscape and their conflict with cattle farmers 🐆 . . . . . #lion#bigcat#bigcatweek#natgeowild#natgeo#beauty#wild#wilderness#wildlife#catsofinstagram#cat#africa#uganda
16.11.2018 23:45:49
@stevewinterphoto @natgeo - A lion with his dinner

I am excited to be speaking
@stevewinterphoto@natgeo - A lion with his dinner I am excited to be speaking tonight for Nat Geo LIVE - “On the Trail of Big Cats” at the Mainstage at the Proctors Theater in Schenectady, NY Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods.What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. In 2010@africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. @africanparksnetwork
14.11.2018 20:44:57
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
GREAT NEWS!!!!!! The Chinese government bowin
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto GREAT NEWS!!!!!! The Chinese government bowing to overwhelming international pressure from environmental groups stated it would temporarily reinstate a ban on the use of rhino horn and tiger bone!!!!!! Making a rare concession, the State Council, China’s cabinet, said that it had decided to postpone an order made last month to undo a 25-year ban on the trade. “The Chinese government has not changed its stance on wildlife protection and will not ease the crackdown on illegal trafficking and trade of rhinos, tigers and their byproducts,” Ding Xuedong, a top official with the council, said in remarks published in the state-run news media on Monday. Rhino horn and tiger parts have rarely been used in Chinese medicine - tiger parts were taken off the list of medicines over 2 decades ago and rhino horn has no medicinal value - as it is made of keratin - like out hair or finger nails. Chinese medicine is primarily herbal remedies - but a small but very lucrative market exists for rhino horn and tiger bone and other endangered species. Tiger parts are used by the wealthy as status symbols - like tiger skin furniture or tiger bone wine. China breeds tigers in farms - which has got to stop to save wild tigers. India is the home of the largest population of tigers like the one above - but Indians do not use tiger products. The tigers are killed there as wild tigers become more valuable than farmed tigers. Check out Wildlife Protection Society of India - and EIA - Environmental Investigation Agency. @WildAid IFAW @wildlifeprotectionsocietyofindia@natgeo@natgeowild Great news - but we need to keep up the pressure to make sure the ban STAYS in place. This tigress is the mother on the cover of our Nat Geo Books - "Tigers Forever” by Steve Winter - written by NG Explorer and Woodrow Wilson Fellow - Sharon Guynup @natgeo@stevewinterphoto@africanparksnetwork@savethetiger@savewildtigers@rhino@WildAid IFAW @wildlifeprotectionsocietyofindia@natgeo@natgeowild@eiaenvironment
13.11.2018 17:14:35
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
GREAT NEWS!!!!!! The Chinese government bowin
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto GREAT NEWS!!!!!! The Chinese government bowing to overwhelming international pressure from environmental groups stated it would temporarily reinstate a ban on the use of rhino horn and tiger bone!!!!!! Making a rare concession, the State Council, China’s cabinet, said that it had decided to postpone an order made last month to undo a 25-year banon the trade. “The Chinese government has not changed its stance on wildlife protection and will not ease the crackdown on illegal trafficking and trade of rhinos, tigers and their byproducts,” Ding Xuedong, a top official with the council, said in remarks published in the state-run news media on Monday. Rhino horn and tiger parts have rarely been used in Chinese medicine - tiger parts were taken off the list of medicines over 2 decades ago and rhino horn has no medicinal value - as it is made of keratin - like out hair or finger nails. Chinese medicine is primarily herbal remedies - but a small but very lucrative market exists for rhino horn and tiger bone. Tiger parts are used by the wealthy as status symbols - like tiger skin furniture or tiger bone wine. Great news - but we need to keep up the pressure to make sure the ban STAYS in place. @natgeo@stevewinterphoto@africanparksnetwork@savethetiger@savewildtigers@rhino
13.11.2018 04:30:31
@stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork photographed in May in Zakouma National P
@stevewinterphoto@africanparksnetwork photographed in May in Zakouma National Park It is with great sadness that I report the news below - I was there in South Africa when they were captured and here in May 2018. The Governments of the Republic of South Africa, Republic of Chad, African Parks and SANParks confirm that an additional two black rhino carcasses have been discovered in Zakouma National Park in Chad, bringing the total mortalities to four, of the six that were reintroduced in May this year. We can confirm that none of these rhinos were poached. Post-mortems have been conducted on the rhino carcasses and various samples of blood, tissue and fecal matter were sent to specialist pathology laboratories in South Africa. Histopathological results thus far have not indicated infectious diseases and plant toxicity as cause of death. Serological evidence has however indicated exposure to trypanosomes, a blood-borne parasite transmitted by tsetse flies, but at this stage it is not suspected to be the cause of the mortalities. Low fat reserves suggest that maladaptation by the rhinos to their new environment is the likely underlying cause, although tests to be undertaken on brain and spinal fluid may shed additional light on the exact cause of deaths. On the advice of a team of veterinarians experienced in working with black rhinos, the remaining two animals are being recaptured and placed in holding facilities in order to facilitate closer management. To this end, a SANParks veterinarian was dispatched to Zakouma National Park to assist with the process, and one rhino has already been recaptured and is doing well in their enclosure. Engagements between the Governments of the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Chad, including SANParks and African Parks remain active as efforts continue to be made to establish clarity around the exact cause of deaths of the four rhinos, and to safeguard the remaining two animals.
11.11.2018 18:24:59
@stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork photographed in May in Zakouma National P
@stevewinterphoto@africanparksnetwork photographed in May in Zakouma National Park on iPhone It is with great sadness that I report the news below - I was there in South Africa when they were captured and here in May 2018. The Governments of the Republic of South Africa, Republic of Chad, African Parks and SANParks confirm that an additional two black rhino carcasses have been discovered in Zakouma National Park in Chad, bringing the total mortalities to four, of the six that were reintroduced in May this year. We can confirm that none of these rhinos were poached. Post-mortems have been conducted on the rhino carcasses and various samples of blood, tissue and fecal matter were sent to specialist pathology laboratories in South Africa. Histopathological results thus far have not indicated infectious diseases and plant toxicity as cause of death. Serological evidence has however indicated exposure to trypanosomes, a blood-borne parasite transmitted by tsetse flies, but at this stage it is not suspected to be the cause of the mortalities. Low fat reserves suggest that maladaptation by the rhinos to their new environment is the likely underlying cause, although tests to be undertaken on brain and spinal fluid may shed additional light on the exact cause of deaths. On the advice of a team of veterinarians experienced in working with black rhinos, the remaining two animals are being recaptured and placed in holding facilities in order to facilitate closer management. To this end, a SANParks veterinarian was dispatched to Zakouma National Park to assist with the process, and one rhino has already been recaptured and is doing well in their enclosure. Engagements between the Governments of the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Chad, including SANParks and African Parks remain active as efforts continue to be made to establish clarity around the exact cause of deaths of the four rhinos, and to safeguard the remaining two animals.
09.11.2018 04:34:09
We’ve got a new show coming out on @natgeowild on December 2nd as part of #bigca
We’ve got a new show coming out on @natgeowild on December 2nd as part of #bigcatweek 🦁 follow me and big cat biologist @alexbraczkowski as we show you the incredible tree-climbing culture of lions in Uganda. One of only three populations that have a culture of climbing trees (ie. Every individual climbs almost every day), these lions are special but threatened. I’ll be posting some of the stills and video @alexbraczkowski@luke_ochse and I got over four months in the field earlier this year 🦁 follow our journey and be sure to tune in 🙏 . . . . . #bigcats#lions#uganda#natgeo#natgeowild#wilderness#wildlife#followme#ugandan@natgeowild@natgeo@natgeoimagecollection
07.11.2018 23:20:07
@natgeo @stevewinterphoto

October 29th - The Government of China revealed that
@natgeo@stevewinterphoto October 29th - The Government of China revealed that it allows commercial trade in tiger bone and rhino horn from farmed animals for use in traditional Chinese medicine research and clinical treatments. Debbie Banks Environmental Investigation Agency Tiger Campaign Director says: Debbie Banks, EIA Tiger Campaign Leader, said: “At a single stroke, China has shattered its reputation as a growing leader in conservation following its domestic ban on the sale of ivory at the start of the year. “It is instead revealed as a sham, its international image in tatters and its credibility destroyed – and all for the sake of deeply questionable business sectors which serve only to drive consumer demand for the parts and products of endangered species. “History will not judge the Government of China kindly or with respect for such a reactionary, ill-judged and damaging decision.” “China’s reputation as a leader in conservation following their domestic ban on the sale of ivory now lies in tatters,” she said in an email. “The news today,” she says, “seriously jeopardizes the future survival of wild tigers by stimulating demand for their body parts instead of eradicating demand,” adding that it also puts rhinos at risk in their African and Asian range countries. “The news today is a staggering display of brazen disregard for global opinion.” China’s action stands in sharp contrast to the country’s moves to combat poaching in recent years. The country has had a 25-year-old ban in place preventing the import or export of these products. And the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies—the official group that dictates what can be used in traditional medicine—also removed rhino horn and tiger bone from its list of products approved for use on patients (though the market still existed for them). I know that this will further the trade in wild tigers - as the “wild tiger” will now be more valuable than farmed - this has shown to be the truth in past years. @natgeo@stevewinterphoto@wildaid@eia_news
30.10.2018 21:27:04
@natgeo @stevewinterphoto

October 29th - The Government of China revealed that
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@natgeo@stevewinterphoto October 29th - The Government of China revealed that it allows commercial trade in tiger bone and rhino horn from farmed animals for use in traditional Chinese medicine research and clinical treatments. Debbie Banks Environmental Investigation Agency Tiger Campaign Director says: “At a single stroke, China has shattered its reputation as a growing leader in conservation following its domestic ban on the sale of ivory at the start of the year. “It is instead revealed as a sham, its international image in tatters and its credibility destroyed – and all for the sake of deeply questionable business sectors which serve only to drive consumer demand for the parts and products of endangered species. “History will not judge the Government of China kindly or with respect for such a reactionary, ill-judged and damaging decision.” “China’s reputation as a leader in conservation following their domestic ban on the sale of ivory now lies in tatters,” she said in an email. “The news today,” she says, “seriously jeopardizes the future survival of wild tigers by stimulating demand for their body parts instead of eradicating demand,” adding that it also puts rhinos at risk in their African and Asian range countries. “The news today is a staggering display of brazen disregard for global opinion.” China’s action stands in sharp contrast to the country’s moves to combat poaching in recent years. The country has had a 25-year-old ban in place preventing the import or export of these products. And the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies—the official group that dictates what can be used in traditional medicine—also removed rhino horn and tiger bone from its list of products approved for use on patients (though the market still existed for them). @natgeo@stevewinterphoto@wildaid@eia_news
30.10.2018 14:42:22
@stevewinterphoto @natgeo

If you are in Philadelphia on Nov 1st please come see
@stevewinterphoto@natgeo If you are in Philadelphia on Nov 1st please come see my Nat Geo Live “On the Trail of Big Cats" at the Merriam Theater at the Kimmel Center!! Jaguar decides it does not want this vulture on the same beach - Shot in August 2018 in the Pantanal of Brazil Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions we will all be better humans. We need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not. Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for people who think they receive the “power of the jaguar through their teeth”, Chinese Traditional Medicine and now Luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have. Follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and THANKS! @stevewinterphoto@natgeo@nglive#nglive@natgeochannel@natgeowild@thephotosociety@natgeocreative@africanparksnetwork@jaguar#jaguar@pantanalsafaris#rightplacerighttime#naturalworldsafaris
29.10.2018 14:57:52
@natgeo @stevewinterphoto shot on iPhone
@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africa
@natgeo@stevewinterphoto shot on iPhone @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork
27.10.2018 03:36:46
@stevewinterphoto @natgeo

Jaguars love the water - this male jag is looking for
@stevewinterphoto@natgeo Jaguars love the water - this male jag is looking for caiman for her dinner - with a female waiting on the bank. Shot in August in the Pantanal of Brazil with @naturalworldsafaris. Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions we will all be better humans. We need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not. Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for people who think they receive the “power of the jaguar through their teeth”, Chinese Traditional Medicine and now Luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have. Follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and THANKS! @stevewinterphoto@natgeo@nglive#nglive@natgeochannel@natgeowild@thephotosociety@natgeocreative@africanparksnetwork@jaguar#jaguar@pantanalsafaris#rightplacerighttime#naturalworldsafaris
25.10.2018 14:29:14
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