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It's not Saturday but here's a great sentence. This one comes from "Original Pri
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It's not Saturday but here's a great sentence. This one comes from "Original Prin," by Randy Boyagoda, a satirical portrait of a Toronto academic who hears the voice of God and heads to the Middle East. Our reviewer calls the book "an original animal, a comedy of literary and cultural references, with wordplay involving unfunny matters like cancer, a crisis of faith and Islamic terrorism, as well as easier comedic subjects like juice-box fatherhood and academic power plays." | @biblioasis_books
25.06.2019 21:45:45
Karen Russell is back! And with her return she brings along the quintessential w
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Karen Russell is back! And with her return she brings along the quintessential weirdness of her stories which call to attention fundamental truths of the human condition which would hardly be considered strange at all. Emily St. John Mandel reviews "Orange World" this week and in doing so, covers some of the outlandish premises Russell uses in her stories to draw out the humanity. - Notable among them per Mandel: “The Prospectors,” two young women struggling to survive in Depression-era Oregon find themselves trapped on a mountain in the company of ghosts, a group of men who are either unaware or unwilling to acknowledge that they’re dead. The ghosts are lying to themselves, but we all do that, don’t we?" - Also, "The Tornado Auction": set in a version of reality where storms are bred for sale, which is to say, a reality where we make our own weather in a manner only slightly more personal than the way we contribute to climate change. Fifteen years after his retirement from the tornado-making business [...] a widower [...] buys a storm on a whim, takes it home and finds himself overcome with joy in the roar of its winds: “But that sound spiraling out, I’d forgotten how a roar like that can fill you up entirely. Hearing loss is part of aging, I suppose. But I hadn’t guessed you could go deaf even to a sound’s howling absence. To the absence of all pleasure in your life.” -Matt Dorfman, art director | 🌪👻 @david_jien
25.06.2019 15:48:13
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In surveying seven whole books on moon landing on the occasion of its anniversar
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In surveying seven whole books on moon landing on the occasion of its anniversary, Jill Lepore asks and seeks answers to the question of why the moon landing mattered then and to what degree it matters now. Historically and culturally, it's both a mixed bag and an insightful reminder that astounding heroics are paid for at the expense of other less regarded, arguably worthier causes. Lepore, in honoring several heartfelt sentiments of those who've seen the earth and moon from up in space, rebuts respectfully: "That’s beautiful. But here’s the hitch. It’s been 50 years. The waters are rising. The Earth needs guarding, and not only by people who’ve seen it from space. Saving the planet requires not racing to the moon again, or to Mars, but to the White House and up the steps of the Capitol, putting one foot in front of the other." -Matt Dorfman, art director | 🍰 + 🎨 @javier_jaen
24.06.2019 20:53:16
Today's #SaturdaySentence comes from "On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous," by @ocea
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Today's #SaturdaySentence comes from "On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous," by @ocean_vuong. In a letter from a son to a mother who can't read, a family history moves through Vietnam and Connecticut as Vuong explores trauma, first love, addiction and masculinity. "In today's culture we're often offered the choice between the ironic shrug of nihilism and positivity-obsessed pop psychology, which suggests that changing one's thought patterns can control and produce desirable feelings. Vuong rejects that binary," writes our reviewer," and the book is brilliant in the way it pays attention not to what our thoughts make us feel, but to what our feelings make us think." | @penguinpress
15.06.2019 18:45:16
Jonathan Rauch reviewed two books this week written by prominent conservatives w
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Jonathan Rauch reviewed two books this week written by prominent conservatives which both ask a valuable question which transcends party affiliation: why are we feeling so bad when life is [relatively, on balance, etc.] good? In writing about "The Right Side of History" by Ben Shapiro and also Clear and Present Safety by Michael A. Cohen and Micah Zenko, Rauch frames his concern like this: "Why, exactly, are so many Americans so angry and unhappy? Almost any other country today, and any prior version of the United States, would give its eyeteeth to enjoy our manifold blessings. The country is prosperous and at peace; it faces rivals and nuisances but no major threat. The government acted decisively and capably to crush jihadist terrorism and avert a global depression. Innovation is galloping, crime is down, kids are behaving, and — the ultimate gift — Americans live almost a decade longer than as recently as 1960. President Obama was just plain right when he wrote, in 2016, “If you had to choose any time in the course of human history to be alive, you’d choose this one. Right here in America, right now.” -Matt Dorfman, art director | 🎨 @na_son
14.06.2019 21:42:26
In celebrating Robert Macfarlane's "Underland," Terry Tempest Williams contextua
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In celebrating Robert Macfarlane's "Underland," Terry Tempest Williams contextualizes it as a panorama of all we do not see and walk on top of daily. This includes (but is not limited to): catacombs, underground rivers, ancient pictographs, funghi, retreating glaciers, and all that our rapidly changing climate is reflecting in all the activity under our feet. Williams praises it thusly: "an epic exploration and examination of darkness and the caverns underground that have captured our imaginations, pulled us downward, housed our dead and allowed us to bury our most violent secrets. It is also a descent into the beauty where dark wisdom is located." | 🎨 @armandoveve
13.06.2019 21:18:23
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Tope Folarin says his debut novel, about a Nigerian-American growing up in Utah,
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Tope Folarin says his debut novel, about a Nigerian-American growing up in Utah, contains both “explicitly autobiographical” and wholly fictional material. In “A Particular Kind of Black Man,” he explores questions about belonging that he says have long been part of his life. Folarin is one of four writers to watch this summer. Click the link in the bio for the full interview. | 📷 @justingellerson
11.06.2019 21:29:25
Today's #SaturdaySentence comes from "No Visible Bruises," by @rlswrites, a deep
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Today's #SaturdaySentence comes from "No Visible Bruises," by @rlswrites, a deep dive into domestic violence in America. "As Rachel Louise Snyder argues in her powerful new book, domestic violence has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Fifty women a month are shot and killed by their partners," writes our reviewer. "Snyder exposes this hidden crisis by combining her own careful analysis with deeply upsetting and thoughtfully told accounts of victims. She rounds out the reporting by interviewing advocates working on the front lines and, even, the abusers themselves." | @bloomsburypublishing
08.06.2019 13:56:08
The brief for @timenthovensillustrations, the artist for Carl Zimmer's review of
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The brief for @timenthovensillustrations, the artist for Carl Zimmer's review of "The Pandemic Century" by Mark Honigsbaum, was relatively direct: "this a history of pandemics, contagious diseases and the ways in which the attendant panic and hysteria has been both justified and not; In addition to all the adjacent misdiagnoses which allow pandemics to flourish." Tim responded with what appeared to be a hastily scrawled melee rendered with a leaky pen and shot on an iphone mid-wiggle. Excitedly he responded: "People + parrot and monkey are sick and running hysterically into each other. Vomit and blood are optional." We sprang for the vomit and blood. -Matt Dorfman, art director
06.06.2019 21:22:14
David Gates reviews Elizabeth Gilbert's "City of Girls" on our front page this w
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David Gates reviews Elizabeth Gilbert's "City of Girls" on our front page this week. Both an extended second look at low-level New York theater in the 1940's as well as a frank chronicle of a young woman's sexual awakening as she discovers the highs and lows of misbehavior — theatrical, sexual and otherwise. Gilbert sets the scene thusly: “We gave the jump to some playboys; we drank rank after rank of cocktails on other people’s dime; we had tumults of fun; and the next thing you knew we were trying to get home before the sun came up, feeling as if we were swimming upstream through bilgewater.” -Matt Dorfman, art director | 🎨 @squinkyelo
05.06.2019 21:03:29
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Today's #SaturdaySentence comes from debut novel "Prince of Monkeys," by 26-year
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Today's #SaturdaySentence comes from debut novel "Prince of Monkeys," by 26-year-old Nigerian Nnamdi Ehirim, about a band of friends that come of age in Lagos. "'Prince of Monkeys' is rife with character soliloquies that relay some of the central issues of Nigerian life, then and now," writes our reviewer. "Given the exhausting struggle to get by amid what feels like an uninterrupted cycle of bombings, riots and corruption, you can't blame these characters for relentlessly remaking themselves." | @counterpointpress
01.06.2019 22:15:25
Ibram Kendi writes for us this week: "To build a nation of equal opportunity for
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Ibram Kendi writes for us this week: "To build a nation of equal opportunity for everyone, we need to dismantle this spurious legacy of our common upbringing. One of the best ways to do this is by reading books. Not books that reinforce old ideas about who we think we are, what we think America is, what we think racism is. Instead, we need to read books that are difficult or unorthodox, that don’t go down easily. Books that force us to confront our self-serving beliefs and make us aware that 'I’m not racist” is a slogan of denial.' Kendi also suggests a minimum of 12 titles spanning themes from the biological to the ethnological, the behavioral to the sexual and how all such components of a life inform racism's steady creep into the everyday. -Matt Dorfman, art director | 🎨 @jningwong
31.05.2019 22:23:59
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