Instagram的标签contactbinary

#Repost @drjeffreythompson
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#Repost @nasa
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying
#Repost@drjeffreythompson ・・・ #Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
20.01.2019 06:50:29
#Repost @nasa
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object eve
#Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
19.01.2019 13:08:09
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#Repost @nasa
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object eve
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#Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
16.01.2019 08:41:47
Notice how the Ultima Thule object looks like BB-8?  Could be a robot space craf
Notice how the Ultima Thule object looks like BB-8? Could be a robot space craft! #aliens@tsoukalos#contactbinary
16.01.2019 04:27:56
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our Ne
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today.  Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute  #nasa #space #kuiperbelt #ultimathule #science#explore #spacecraft #newhorizons #newyearseve#newyearsday #discovery #contactbinary #data#spheres #solarsystem#thenewhorizon#pluto#astroid
14.01.2019 09:28:12
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#Repost @nasa
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object eve
#Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
12.01.2019 04:04:23
photo credit @nasa
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ev
photo credit @nasa Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
08.01.2019 16:40:48
(486958) 2014 MU₆₉ — транснептуновый астероид из пояса Койпера, избранный в каче
(486958) 2014 MU₆₉ — транснептуновый астероид из пояса Койпера, избранный в качестве цели для изучения в рамках расширенной миссии космического аппарата «Новые горизонты» после пролёта мимо Плутона в 2015 году. Аппарат достиг его 1 января 2019 года, пройдя на расстоянии около 3500 км.
07.01.2019 22:28:35
Exciting news comes from a new photo documented by NASA's spacecraft New Horizon
Exciting news comes from a new photo documented by NASA's spacecraft New Horizons! This photo shows the first ever sighting of something called a contact binary. Contact Binary is when two objects are joined together through a large impact. Scientists predict by the shape of the object that it first joined together when the universe was started! #nasa#loomonauts#contactbinary#marketing
07.01.2019 18:16:31
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#AstroMonday Meet #ultimathule a contact binary system and the furthest object e
#AstroMonday Meet #ultimathule a contact binary system and the furthest object ever explored by a spacecraft from Earth (New Horizons). This Kuiper Belt object is at 6.5 billion kilometers away from the Sun. The contact binary that consists of Ultimate and Thule formed likely from a gentle collision shortly after the birth of the Solar System Image credit: @nasa . . . . #space#nasa#newhorizons#contactbinary#astronomy#kuiperbelt#solarsystem
07.01.2019 15:52:38
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
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#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
07.01.2019 12:58:33
Meet UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New
1.1K 16
Meet UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. . . . Sci_media . . . Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
06.01.2019 03:43:27
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our Ne
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
05.01.2019 08:28:41
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✨✨ LOOK▫️TO▫️THE▫️STARS ✨✨
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'Humanity is at its best when we look to the star
• ✨✨ LOOK▫️TO▫️THE▫️STARS ✨✨ • 'Humanity is at its best when we look to the stars.' • The #majesty and #wonder in the 'beauty of our own solar system'. • @nasa . Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored ( 6bn kilometres away ) , the New Horizons spacecraft just beamed back the first pictures and science data. . These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. . The two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system. . Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. . Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
04.01.2019 18:16:06
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our Ne
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
04.01.2019 17:39:26
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our Ne
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today.  Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute  #nasa #space #kuiperbelt #ultimathule #science#explore #spacecraft #newhorizons #newyearseve#newyearsday #discovery #contactbinary #data#spheres #solarsystem Follow :- @know_space_with_yy 😉🚀🚀
04.01.2019 15:48:27
@nasa 
After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons s
@nasa After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
04.01.2019 12:26:30
UltimaThule
The New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and scien
UltimaThule The New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
04.01.2019 10:56:18
#Repost @nasa with @repostsaveapp · · ·  Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the
#Repost@nasa with @repostsaveapp · · · Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
04.01.2019 07:09:31
inglês

Conheça #UltimaThule! Depois de voar pelo objeto mais distante já explor
inglês Conheça #UltimaThule! Depois de voar pelo objeto mais distante já explorado, nossa espaçonave New Horizons retratou as primeiras fotos e dados científicos. Essas novas imagens, tiradas a partir de 17.000 milhas, revelaram que esse objeto é um “binário de contato”, consistindo de duas esferas conectadas. De ponta a ponta, Ultima Thule mede 19 milhas de comprimento. A equipe apelidou a esfera maior “Ultima” e a esfera menor “Thule”. A equipe diz que as duas esferas provavelmente se juntaram a 99% do caminho de volta para a formação do sistema solar, não colidindo mais do que dois carros em um fender-bender. Provavelmente se formou ao longo do tempo quando uma nuvem rotativa de corpos pequenos e gelados começou a se combinar. Eventualmente, dois corpos maiores permaneceram e lentamente ... #Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
04.01.2019 04:35:26
#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most dist
#Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 22:59:46
Meet Ultima Thule!
After flying by the most distant object ever explored, New Ho
Meet Ultima Thule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, New Horizons beamed back the first pictures and science data... Revealed that Ultima Thule is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. Repost from @NASA. And humanity continues exploring further than ever before. Go to space — link in bio.
03.01.2019 22:46:44
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our Ne
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 22:32:38
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 19:33:04
Reposted from @nasa -  Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant objec
Reposted from @nasa - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem - #regrann
03.01.2019 18:08:49
Meet #UltimaThule - courtesy of the New Horizons spacecraft.
Credit: NASA/Johns
Meet #UltimaThule - courtesy of the New Horizons spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute Follow @spacelaunchnow for more!
03.01.2019 17:53:52
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 17:17:40
I know you already seen it a lot but it’s too cool to not post! 
#RepostPlus @na
I know you already seen it a lot but it’s too cool to not post! #RepostPlus@nasa - - - - - - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 17:12:35
#Repost @nasa
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object eve
#Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 15:49:06
Reposted from @nasa -  Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant objec
Reposted from @nasa - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem - #regrann
03.01.2019 15:39:24
this is SO COOL U GUYS

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After
this is SO COOL U GUYS #Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 14:42:29
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our Ne
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 14:15:51
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 14:05:47
#Repost @nasa
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object eve
#Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 11:46:22
#Repost @nasa This is amazing news
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the mo
#Repost@nasa This is amazing news ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 11:31:00
What a wonderful way to start a new year for #Science. It's unimaginable how rev
What a wonderful way to start a new year for #Science. It's unimaginable how revolutionary this breakthrough is and will be. One step closer to universal knowledge. #Repost@nasa • • • • • Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 11:24:30
울티마툴레 (Ultimate Thule). 소행성.
주기 295년. New horizons.
태양에서 65억Km 🤩.
ㆍ ㆍㆍ
 #Repost
울티마툴레 (Ultimate Thule). 소행성. 주기 295년. New horizons. 태양에서 65억Km 🤩. ㆍ ㆍㆍ #Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 11:12:56
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 10:50:30
; #Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most
; #Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 10:48:42
.
تشاهد في هذه الصوره Ultima Thule، و هو أبعد جسم فضائى تم استكشافه بواسطة مركبة
. تشاهد في هذه الصوره Ultima Thule، و هو أبعد جسم فضائى تم استكشافه بواسطة مركبة فضائية على الإطلاق، حيث يبعد عن الشمس مسافة تبلغ 4 مليار ميل الصورة ملتقطة بواسطة مركبة Horizons @nasa . . . #تكنولوجيا#تقنية#شركات#اعمال#اخبار#ميناتك#فضاء#ناسا#technology#tech#news#nasa#TheMENATech#MENATECH#technews#nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 10:30:13
#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most dist
#Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 09:29:20
nasa 🤩🤩🤩
meet #UltimaThule! After the most distant object ever explored, our new
nasa 🤩🤩🤩 meet #UltimaThule! After the most distant object ever explored, our new Horizons spacecraft beamed back. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that the "contact binary," consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the big sphere "Ultima" and the small sphere "Thule" The team says that the two spheres are likely to join as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender It's likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 large bodies remained and spirited closer so that they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how the planets form- both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. New Year's Day flyby from data is coming up to the next weeks and months, much higher resolution images with yet to come Credit: NASA / Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 09:08:09
.
🇬🇧 I’m so happy!.
🇮🇹 Sono così felice!.
#Repost @nasa
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! A
. 🇬🇧 I’m so happy!. 🇮🇹 Sono così felice!. #Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 08:28:31
#Repost @nasa
• • • • •
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant obje
#Repost@nasa • • • • • Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 08:14:27
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 07:35:28
So, do you want to build a #snowman?

#NASA's #NewHorizon #spaceprobe just zippe
So, do you want to build a #snowman?#NASA's#NewHorizon#spaceprobe just zipped by #UltimaThule this New Year! At 4 billion miles away and smack in the middle of the #Kuiperbelt, it is the furthest object we've ever photographed up close! A pretty mean feat! Here's one of the latest photos that the probe has sent back. It looks like a 31 x 19 km snowman which, can be a pretty accurate description as it is a very cold body that is most likely coated by ice. Judging by it's looks, it was probably two semi-spherical objects that gently drifted together eventually merging in the end - technically called a #contactbinary. Oh yeah, this picture is monochrome but the object is actually somewhat reddish. Can't wait to see higher resolution colored images of Ultima Thule! #space#science#sciencebitch#Kuiperbeltobject#宇宙#宇宙探査機#カイパーベルト#科学#雪だるま
03.01.2019 07:20:34
Reposted from @nasa -  Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant objec
12 0
Reposted from @nasa - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem - #regrann
03.01.2019 06:07:39
“Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our N
“Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come.” #repost@nasa Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 05:52:00
#Repost @nasa
• • • • •
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant obje
22 0
#Repost@nasa • • • • • Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 05:40:29
#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most dist
#Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 05:18:43
#Repost @nasa
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever ex
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#Repost@nasa Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem#astronomy#astrophysics#universe
03.01.2019 04:46:51
@novapbs
On January 1, and 12:33 a.m., the New Horizons spacecraft attempted to
@novapbs On January 1, and 12:33 a.m., the New Horizons spacecraft attempted to fly by a mysterious object known as Ultima Thule, believed to be a primordial building block of the solar system. Three years after taking the first spectacular photos of Pluto, New Horizons is four billion miles from Earth, having just achieved the most distant flyby in NASA’s history. Now, the mission is shedding light on one of the least understood regions of our solar system: the Kuiper Belt. ... . @firouz_michael_naderi New Year’s Eve Rendezvous. New Horizon spacecraft now traveling through the Kuiper Belt has a new year’s eve date with Ultima Thule (Latin for “beyond the known world”). The vast, distant Kuiper Belt is home to millions of frozen, primitive objects Pluto being one of the largest. . @nasa Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 04:18:49
Este es Ultima Thule. Después de sobrevolar el objeto más distante jamás explora
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Este es Ultima Thule. Después de sobrevolar el objeto más distante jamás explorado, la nave espacial New Horizons envió las primeras imágenes y datos científicos. Estas nuevas imágenes, tomadas desde unos 27,000 kilómetros, revelaron que este objeto es un "binario de contacto", que consiste en dos esferas conectadas. De extremo a extremo, Ultima Thule mide 31 kilómetros de largo. El equipo ha apodado la esfera más grande "Ultima" y la esfera más pequeña "Thule". El equipo dice que las dos esferas probablemente llevan unidas el 99 por ciento del tiempo que lleva formado el sistema solar. Estudiar a Ultima Thule nos ayuda a comprender cómo se forman los planetas, tanto en nuestro propio sistema solar como en otras estrellas de nuestra galaxia. Los datos del sobrevuelo del Día de Año Nuevo continuarán llegando en las próximas semanas y meses, con imágenes de mayor resolución por venir. Credito: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 04:18:15
Excited to see one of Pluto’s neighbors out in the Kuiper Belt, Ultima Thule! Th
Excited to see one of Pluto’s neighbors out in the Kuiper Belt, Ultima Thule! This is furthest object away from Earth we’ve ever been able to explore using human-made machinery, the New Horizons spacecraft. Can’t wait to get the high def images in the coming weeks! #LBCE2019#SpaceExpo19#space#science#NASA#UltimaThule#NewHorizons#KuiperBelt#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 04:09:15
#Repost @nasa 💕🤔
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever
#Repost@nasa 💕🤔 Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 03:47:25
Conozcamos Ultima Tule. 
La sonda New Horizons después de dejar Plutón exploró u
Conozcamos Ultima Tule. La sonda New Horizons después de dejar Plutón exploró uno de los objetos más distantes del sistema solar. Estudiar Ultima Tule nos ayuda a entender la formación del sistema solar e imagenes en mejor resolución estarán por llegar en los próximas semanas y meses. #Repost@nasa Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 03:36:15
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 03:26:04
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 03:22:50
Like a one-eyed slithery monster crawling through space.  This object  measures
Like a one-eyed slithery monster crawling through space. This object measures a mere 21kms across but is 4 Billion Miles away from us .. amazing that @NASA is able to get a picture #Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystemtattoo
03.01.2019 03:17:47
#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most dist
#Repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 03:07:40
#Repost @nasa
• • •
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object e
#Repost@nasa • • • Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 02:41:06
¡Amazing! 🌘🌎🌌
#Repost @nasa
• • • • •
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the mos
¡Amazing! 🌘🌎🌌 #Repost@nasa • • • • • Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 02:09:22
Conoce a #UltimaThule! Después de volar por el objeto más distante jamás explora
Conoce a #UltimaThule! Después de volar por el objeto más distante jamás explorado, nuestra nave espacial New Horizons envió las primeras imágenes y datos científicos. Estas nuevas imágenes, tomadas desde cerca de 17,000 millas, revelaron que este objeto es un "binario de contacto", que consiste en dos esferas conectadas. De extremo a extremo, Ultima Thule mide 19 millas de largo. El equipo ha apodado la esfera más grande "Ultima" y la esfera más pequeña "Thule". El equipo dice que las dos esferas probablemente se unieron tan pronto como el 99 por ciento del camino de regreso a la formación del sistema solar, chocando no más rápido que dos autos en un guardabarros. Probablemente se formó con el tiempo cuando una nube giratoria de cuerpos pequeños y helados comenzó a combinarse. Finalmente, 2 cuerpos más grandes permanecieron y lentamente giraron en espiral hasta que se tocaron, formando el objeto bilobulado que vemos hoy. Estudiar a Ultima Thule nos ayuda a comprender cómo se forman los planetas, tanto en nuestro propio sistema solar como en otras estrellas en órbita en nuestra galaxia. Los datos del sobrevuelo del Día de Año Nuevo continuarán llegando en las próximas semanas y meses, con imágenes de mayor resolución por venir. Crédito: NASA / Laboratorio de Física Aplicada de la Universidad Johns Hopkins / Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#yyyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 01:29:33
say hello to Ultima Thule! 💫

Reposted from @nasa -  Meet #UltimaThule! After fl
say hello to Ultima Thule! 💫 Reposted from @nasa - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 00:53:51
Reposted from @nasa -  Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant objec
Reposted from @nasa - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem - #regrann
03.01.2019 00:50:10
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most d
#Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 00:49:41
#Repost from @nasa by @quicksave.app
・・・
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the
#Repost from @nasa by @quicksave.app ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem#InstaSaveApp#QuickSaveApp
03.01.2019 00:26:03
#Repost @nasa
• • • • •
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant obje
#Repost@nasa • • • • • Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
03.01.2019 00:02:22
#Repost @nasa:
Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever e
#Repost@nasa: Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#science#spacecraft#solarsystem#spheres#contactbinary#data#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#explore#exploration#galaxy#life#planet#today#wednesday#january#2019#picoftheday#blackandwhite#flyby#object#discovery
02.01.2019 23:36:20
Four BILLION miles from the sun. Formed in a collision "no faster than two cars
Four BILLION miles from the sun. Formed in a collision "no faster than two cars in a fender-bender." #Repost@nasa ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
02.01.2019 23:32:50
Reposted from @nasa -  Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant objec
Reposted from @nasa - Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem - #regrann
02.01.2019 23:30:09
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#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
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Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by th
🤯🤯🤯 • • #Repost@nasa with @get_repost ・・・ Meet #UltimaThule! After flying by the most distant object ever explored, our New Horizons spacecraft beamed back the first pictures and science data. These new images, taken from as close as 17,000 miles, revealed that this object is a “contact binary,” consisting of two connected spheres. End to end, Ultima Thule measures 19 miles in length. The team has dubbed the larger sphere “Ultima” and the smaller sphere “Thule”. The team says that the two spheres likely joined as early as 99 percent of the way back to the formation of the solar system, colliding no faster than two cars in a fender-bender. It likely formed over time as a rotating cloud of small, icy bodies started to combine. Eventually, 2 larger bodies remained and slowly spiraled closer until they touched, forming the bi-lobed object we see today. Studying Ultima Thule is helping us understand how planets form — both those in our own solar system and those orbiting other stars in our galaxy. Data from the New Year's Day flyby will continue to arrive over the next weeks and months, with much higher resolution images yet to come. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute #nasa#space#kuiperbelt#ultimathule#science#explore#spacecraft#newhorizons#newyearseve#newyearsday#discovery#contactbinary#data#spheres#solarsystem
02.01.2019 23:25:43
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