AfricanParksNetwork (@africanparksnetwork) — African Parks is a conservation NGO that manages National Parks & Protected Areas on behalf of governments across Africa to benefit wildlife & people
New counter-poaching puppies in @akagerapark, Rwanda! Two of Akagera’s anti-poac
New counter-poaching puppies in @akagerapark, Rwanda! Two of Akagera’s anti-poaching dogs have given birth to a total of 11 puppies, and are all being well cared for by the head trainer of the canine team. One mother, named Nyumba, was one of two dogs recruited from the local community last year and trained as a tracking dog. Local dogs may have a stronger and natural resistance to canine trypanosome, an often deadly disease transmitted by tsetse flies. Yesterday the @nytimes featured Akagera as a prime safari destination (link in bio). Law enforcement has been critical in achieving this result allowing for key wildlife populations to flourish, and for the historic reintroductions of both lions and rhinos. The K9 anti-poaching unit has formed an integral part to this strategy, and the rangers and their canine counterparts have contributed to this ensuring that poaching is at an all-time low, making it safe for nature’s return. In just eight years, Akagera has become a national treasure, bringing in much-needed revenue for local communities ensuring that both people and wildlife can thrive. #africanparks#conservation#wildlife#goodnews#africa#akagera#rwanda#rangers#hope#nature#nationalpark
18.09.2018 18:02:16
Akagera National Park in Rwanda is defying the odds. Today, the @nytimes feature
Akagera National Park in Rwanda is defying the odds. Today, the @nytimes featured the remarkable story of @akagerapark, a park whose biodiversity was almost lost by late 2000, but has since been restored. Refugees returning to Rwanda in 1994 turned to Akagera’s natural resources for survival. Lions were hunted to extinction by the late 90’s, and the last rhino was seen in 2007. More than 30,000 cattle filled the park, and tourism had disappeared. In 2010 however, African Parks assumed management of Akagera in partnership with the Rwandan Development Board and worked with local communities to shift the park’s trajectory from one of oblivion to prosperity and hope. Law enforcement was overhauled – snares were removed, arrests made and bushmeat confiscated and a canine anti-poaching dog unit was deployed. In 2016, a helicopter arrived thanks to the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, and a k9 ranger unit was implemented, resulting nearly eradicating poaching altogether. With safety restored, lions were reintroduced to the park in 2015 (the population has since tripled) and in 2017, 18 Eastern black rhinos were delivered back to the park, and to Rwanda, after a 10-year absence. Tourism has flourished with more than 37,000 tourists visiting Akagera last year, half of whom were Rwandan nationals, bringing in a record US$1.6 million making the park 75% self-financing in just seven years. This story, along with two of the park’s beautiful camps, Ruzizi Lodge and Karenge Bush Camp which are run by African Parks, are featured in the @nytimes – highlighting the importance of tourism as a key economic driver that supports our efforts to restore the landscape, so both people and wildlife can thrive. Click the link in the bio to read the full article, follow @akagerapark to learn more, and book your visit to Akagera – we’d love to see you there. 🎥 @drewbantlin#AfricanParks#Akagera#Rwanda#Conservation@bucketlisters#bucketlist#travel#safari#ecotourism#elephant
17.09.2018 16:44:20
Advertisement
Sea-faring rangers are protecting Bazaruto National Park’s extraordinary marine
Sea-faring rangers are protecting Bazaruto National Park’s extraordinary marine biodiversity in Mozambique. Bazaruto, an archipelago off the coast of Mozambique, is often referred to as an African paradise. It is a seascape that is home to the rare and elusive dugong along with other iconic species that include dolphins, whales and turtles. However, the park’s biodiversity is under threat due to unsustainable resource utilisation (mainly due to overfishing). Our rangers are essential for protecting this seascape while also ensuring that the local communities who live there benefit from the park’s existence. In 2017 African Parks assumed management of Bazaruto, the first marine park in our portfolio, in partnership with Mozambique’s National Administration of Conservation Areas (ANAC). We immediately set to work recruiting and training rangers, working towards a more sustainably managed tourism destination, and establishing community livelihood programmes with the hopes of building a conservation-led economy where people and wildlife thrive. Learn more about our work in Bazaruto by clicking the link in our bio.
14.09.2018 15:09:39
For all our supporters based in the Netherlands, today is your chance to be tran
For all our supporters based in the Netherlands, today is your chance to be transported into Liuwa Plain National Park, in Zambia, one of Africa’s most exceptional parks. Watch NPO 1’s “Heroes of the Wild” ("Helden van de Wildernis") at 21:30 this evening and follow Daan Smit, a researcher from the @zcp_org as he shares his passion for Liuwa’s predators which include lions, cheetahs and the hyeanas. For the past five years, Daan has lived as a researcher (and in a tent!) monitoring the growing predator population in Liuwa, which has been under the management of African Parks since 2003. With predator populations in decline across Africa as a result of poaching, loss of habitat and the demand from the illegal wildlife trade, our partnerships with the DNPW and Zambian Carnivore Programme are critical to ensuring that these iconic predators are protected and live long into the future in Zambia. Click the link in the bio to learn more.
13.09.2018 15:17:50
Bangweulu means “where water meets the sky” – which is a perfect description for
Bangweulu means “where water meets the sky” – which is a perfect description for these incredible and globally significant wetlands in Zambia, which are a life-source for countless people, birds and other wildlife. This park is unique in that it is a community owned protected wetland, home to 50,000 people who depend fully on the richness the park provides. Our community scouts are essential to the long-term protection of these wetlands, conducting anti-poaching patrols, removing snares, confiscating bushmeat, preventing illegal fishing, and ensuring that communities adhere to three-month fishing bans – which are now well-supported and have resulted in improved catch rates and a rise in fish sales, economically benefitting local communities. Bangweulu has become the largest employer in the region and is a burgeoning example of how effectively run protected areas can benefit people and wildlife alike. Photo: @mana_meadows#AfricanParks#Liuwa#Zambia#Wildlife#Community#nature#travel#adventure#safari
11.09.2018 13:01:42
Three years ago, seven wild lions returned to Akagera National Park, in Rwanda,
Three years ago, seven wild lions returned to Akagera National Park, in Rwanda, for the first time in 20 years. Today, we are pleased to share that the pride has increased to over 20! This is hopeful news, as lion populations are in decline across Africa – fewer than 20,000 lions remain, down from 200,000 a Century ago – and they are severely threatened by habitat loss, lack of prey, and being hunted due to conflict and even for their teeth, claws, and skin for the illegal market. Just recently, African Parks also reintroduced nine lions to Liwonde National Park, in Malawi. Our hope is that this lion population is able to grow and thrive, as Akagera’s lion population has. Ground-breaking big cat conservation initiatives, like these, are ensuring that wild lions are able to recover in safe places and live long into the future. Read more about the recent lion translocation by clicking the link in the bio. Photo: Sarah Hall #AfricanParks#Rwanda#Lions#BigCats#Akagera#NaturesReturn#africa#cubs#pride#savethelions#cats#wildlife
07.09.2018 15:55:21
Advertisement
Did you know that many of the parks under our management are critical habitats f
Did you know that many of the parks under our management are critical habitats for rare and endangered avian species? Two of the most iconic and recognisable include the pre-historic looking shoebill stork, in Zambia’s Bangweulu Wetlands, and the grey crowned crane in Rwanda’s Akagera National Park. The @guardian recently raised concern around the extinction of key bird species that is unfolding on large continents, driven by human habitat destruction. There are eight bird species that have been confirmed, or highly likely, to be extinct in this decade according to a new statistical analysis by @birdlife_insta. With more than 26,000 of the world’s species now threatened, according to the latest IUCN “red list” assessment, well managed protected areas have the potential to mitigate these threats and provide safe harbour for countless species. At African Parks, we are managing 10.5 million hectares of ecologically diverse landscapes across Africa, with 15 parks in nine countries, and our hope is to provide protection to the people and wildlife who call these parks home. Read the full @guardian article by clicking the link in the bio. Photo: @morgan_trimble#AfricanParks#ProtectedAreas#conservation#Zambia#Rwanda#birds#nature#birdsofinstagram#wildlife#naturephotography#birding#travel#wildlifephotography#birdwatching#bestbirdshots
06.09.2018 15:30:24
Ranger Ghislain Somba Alhadji, an accomplished member of @garamba_national_park
Ranger Ghislain Somba Alhadji, an accomplished member of @garamba_national_park law enforcement team in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), has been recognised at the annual rhino conservation awards, where he was presented with the 'Special Award for Endangered Species Conservation'. For over 20 years, Mr. Alhadji has risked his life to protect wildlife in the DRC. His reason for doing so is simple – he says he “wants to save the country’s national heritage for the benefit of future generations”. In his role as current Deputy Park Director for Garamba he understands this is a lofty goal—but refuses to be discouraged from achieving it. “It is my deepest hope that this recognition encourages both the winners and nominees to continue the remarkable work that is being done to save the rhino across the continent," said Andrew Campbell, of the @GameRangersAssociationofAfrica who presented the award. Join with us in commending Mr. Alhadji’s commitment to protecting wildlife for the benefit of people and wildlife in Garamba. For the full list of awardees please click the link in our bio. #AfricanParks#Ranger#DRC#GameRanger#wildlife#wildlifeconservation#Community#nature#africa
05.09.2018 14:02:27
A mother cheetah and her cubs on the grasslands of Liuwa Plain National Park in
A mother cheetah and her cubs on the grasslands of Liuwa Plain National Park in Zambia. Not only are new cheetah cubs being born in the park, but for the first time in eight years a male cheetah coalition has been spotted! They form part of a healthy population of predators, including the legendary pride of lions and more than 500 hyenas, that are on the rise since African Parks assumed management of the park in 2003. But we could not have achieved these results alone. Liuwa's local community members, who were appointed as the custodians of the park as early as the 19th century by the King of Barotseland, have been integral in helping protect the park, along with the DNPW and @zcp_org. Follow @liuwaplainnationalpark for the latest park updates. Photo: @life.on.the.african.plains#AfricanParks#Liuwa#Zambia#BigCats#Cheetah#bigcats#safari#wildlife#africa#nature#animals#wildlifephotography#travel#bigcatsofinstagram#picoftheday
04.09.2018 14:58:58
Liwonde National Park Rangers recently rescued another highly endangered pangoli
Liwonde National Park Rangers recently rescued another highly endangered pangolin, during a law enforcement operation outside the park, bringing the total number of pangolins rescued in the last year and a half to seven. All of these have been released into the wild in Liwonde National Park. Pangolins were previously relatively unknown, but they have risen to notoriety as possibly the world's most trafficked mammals in recent years. Sadly, these secretive little ‘scaly anteaters’ are hunted for food; their scales are used in traditional medicine and even for fashion. However, there are stringent measures being taken to protect them. Just last month the Malawi Parliament passed new regulations that place an additional 216 species under protection. The regulations form a critical secondary law to the National Parks and Wildlife Act (NPWA), which came into effect in 2017, and which most notably increased the maximum penalty for wildlife crime to up to 30 years in prison. Read more about how Malawi is protecting their natural heritage by clicking the link in the bio. 🎥 Liwonde National Park #AfricanParks#Malawi#Pangolin#Liwonde#Endangered#Wildlife#WorthMoreAlive#Rangers#ForceForGood
03.09.2018 14:58:09
Advertisement
As part of our historic lion reintroduction to Liwonde in Malawi, where lions ar
As part of our historic lion reintroduction to Liwonde in Malawi, where lions are now back after 20 years, five wild lions from South Africa were also translocated to Majete Wildlife Reserve. These new lions join the reserve's growing pride, which were initially reintroduced to the reserve by African Parks in 2012 years after they were hunted to local extinction. The arrival of these lions to Majete will increase the genetic diversity of that pride, aiding in their healthy, long-term future where they can breed and thrive. We want this population to grow as part of the overall ecological restoration of the reserve, help boost tourism, and use this growing population as a source to potentially repopulate other reserves in Malawi where lions have gone locally extinct or need supplementing to improve genetic integrity. Liwonde National Park received two lions from Majete along with seven lions from South Africa to create a healthy founder population. While fewer than 20,000 lions remain across Africa, these introductions highlight the ongoing restoration of Malawi’s natural heritage by the Malawian Government and African Parks for the long-term benefit of Malawi’s people. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @wesley_hartmann#AfricanParks#LionsReturn#Majete#Malawi#Wildlife#BigCats#NaturesReturn#Instagood#Africa#WildlifePhotography
31.08.2018 16:33:07
More than four decades ago, 26 young elephants 🐘 made a historic journey to Akag
More than four decades ago, 26 young elephants 🐘 made a historic journey to Akagera National Park in Rwanda. Human-wildlife conflict had reached a breaking point in Bugesera, an area of farmland situated in the south of Rwanda, and the decision was made to translocate these giant land mammals to Akagera. Today, there are more than 100 elephants living in the park, including some of those original elephants. Effective park management has provided them with the space they have needed to breed and thrive. African Parks entered into a long-term partnership with the Rwandan Development Board in 2010 and since then we have practically eliminated poaching; we reintroduced lions in 2015 and rhinos in 2017 and tourism is booming making this park over 75% self financing. Akagera is a shinning light for conservation in Africa, and shows what is possible with political commitment, donor support and effective park management. Follow this story of hope at @akagerapark.org Photo: Vysakh Nambiar #AfricanParks#wildlife#conservation#rwanda#akagera#elephant#africa#safari#nature#wildlifephotography#savetheelephants#elephantlove#jointheherd
30.08.2018 15:01:26
(Watch) Unspoilt and untamed: Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Congo has been
(Watch) Unspoilt and untamed: Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Congo has been listed as one of the top unspoilt destinations travellers need to visit – and now! Situated in the world’s second-largest tropical rainforest, Odzala is an extraordinary landscape where rare forest elephants, chimpanzees, and gorillas roam free. This burgeoning ecotourism destination has three luxury camps which are managed by @ccc_odzala, and are located deep in the heart of the forest. Odzala offers unparalleled tourism experiences: wildlife safaris, boat trips on the Congo River and stargazing to name a few. Visitors even have the unique opportunity to go gorilla trekking and spend time with Western Lowland Gorillas of which as many as 22,000 live within the park – 60% of the worlds’ global population but is a species listed as critically endangered by the IUCN and is in urgent need of protection. Tourism is one of the ways you can contribute to the protection of these incredible animals and many other threated wildlife, as revenue is reinvested in conservation activities in the park and goes back to supporting local communities. Read the full list by clicking the link in our bio and start planning your visit today. #AfricanParks#Gorilla#RainForest#Wildlife#Forest#Congo#Odzala#Africa#Endangered
29.08.2018 15:16:43
We’ve had a very special sighting captured all on camera! This little leopard cu
We’ve had a very special sighting captured all on camera! This little leopard cub posed for his closeup on one of our camera traps in @garamba_national_park. Fortunately, it was all caught on camera. Unfortunately, just a moment later he destroyed all the hardware! But it was definitely worth it, as sightings like these remind us what we are fighting for, and are rare (only seven leopard observations have been made in this park since the beginning of 2018). While Garamba is one of Africa's oldest national parks, a stunning landscape that was declared a World Heritage site in 1938, it has sadly been referred to over the years as ground zero in the elephant poaching wars in Africa. But more recently, in just the last two years, our efforts have significantly reduced illegal activity in the park; poaching is down and key wildlife populations have stabilized or are on the rise. Nature is returning to this corner of the world, and the security we’re providing is benefiting both the people and wildlife in and around the park. Find out more about our work with wildlife, especially with big cats, by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @mathiasdhaen#AfricanParks#BigCats#Garamba#DRC#LeopardsReturn#BigCatsReturn#NaturesReturn#Leopard#Wildlife
28.08.2018 17:21:57
Advertisement
The recent news of the historic return of lions to Liwonde, signalling the reviv
The recent news of the historic return of lions to Liwonde, signalling the revival of this apex predator to this park in Malawi for the first time in two decades, has been featured by the @Smithsonian . The article details the remarkable journey these lions have taken, with seven lions moved from South Africa (a 1,000-mile journey by plane) and two from Majete Wildlife Reserve in Malawi (a reserve also Managed by African Parks where we brought lions back in 2012) . Once the lions arrived in Liwonde over the past few months, they were kept in specially built bomas prior to their release. “Their time in bomas, or enclosures, helped these lions bond and begin forming cohesive prides,” said Liwonde’s Park Manager, Craig Reid. “Our hope is that they will form two separate prides, which will foster greater diversity and demographic interactions that naturally take place between lion prides.” These nine individuals make up the initial founder population of lions for Liwonde. With fewer than 20,000 lions remaining across Africa, projects like these show how effective management, political commitment, and community and donor support can aid in the recovery and protection of an endangered species. Join us in welcoming them as they start their new lives in the park. Read the full article by clicking the link in the bio. Photo: @adrianeohanesian#MalawisPride#LionsReturn#Liwonde#Malawi#BigCats#AfricanParks#PredatorsRestored
27.08.2018 15:10:18
Liuwa Plain’s King Lewanika Lodge has just been named one of @time’s World’s Gre
Liuwa Plain’s King Lewanika Lodge has just been named one of @time’s World’s Greatest Places. King Lewanika Lodge, managed by our partners @timeandtideafrica, immerses guests in the heart of this extraordinary national park in Zambia with a rich history, offering unparalleled beauty, an abundance of wildlife, and luxury tourism -without the crowds. This remarkable accolade follows 15 years of tireless work on the ground by African Parks in partnership with the Zambian Department of National Park and Wildlife and the Barotse Royal Establishment. Together, we have secured the park and work with communities to make @liuwaplainnationalpark the national treasure it is today – home to the second largest wildebeest migration in Africa, and Liuwa’s famous predators – lions, cheetahs, and hyenas – who find sanctuary in this breath-taking park. This is TIME’s first annual list of the World’s Greatest Places, highlighting 100 destinations that are breaking new ground, leading industry trends and offering visitors an extraordinary experience. We are exceptionally privileged to be included in the first edition of this list, as tourism is critical in creating job opportunities and generates much-needed revenue, directly benefiting people and wildlife who live in the park. Swipe through the gallery or click the link in the bio to see the full list. 📷 @a.mac.photo (1 & 2) and @timeandtideafrica#AfricanParks#GreatestPlaces#Liuwa#Zambia#KingLewanika#Conservation#Wildlife#Tourism#Safari#Bucketlist
24.08.2018 14:11:56
Lions need your help! Only 20,000 wild lions are left across Africa, threatened
Lions need your help! Only 20,000 wild lions are left across Africa, threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of wild prey and poaching for the lucrative illegal wildlife trade. To ensure lions live long into the future, they require constant monitoring and protection from the threats all around them. With lions just recently returned to Liwonde National Park in Malawi after a 20-year absence, our Rangers are the boots on the ground who are facing these threats head on. But we need your support. Your donation of any amount can help provide our Rangers with the equipment they need to ensure lions survive long into the future. Please click the link in the bio to donate today where 100% of your donation goes directly to he ground to support initiatives like these. 📷 @heinrichvandenberg#AfricanParks#Lions#BigCats#Predators#LionsReturn#LionRecovery#Donate
23.08.2018 16:22:01
Renewed hope for lion populations across Africa  as an innovative conservation i
Renewed hope for lion populations across Africa as an innovative conservation initiative paves the way for their survival. Nine lions made history this past week when they were translocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, returning the species to the park for the first time in 20 years. Liwonde was on the verge of collapse just three years ago when the park was overrun with poachers and more wire snares existed in the park than large animals. But this all changed in 2015. @africanparksnetwork assumed management of Liwonde, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, and changed the trajectory of the park, making it safe for nature to return. Ranger units were trained and outfitted to address the threat of poaching head on, and their efforts have resulted in almost 31,000 snares being removed from the park – and in the process, they have saved countless animalsfrom a painful death. But African Parks did not stop there. In 2017, we set to work restoring ecological balance to the park. Last year, we reintroduced cheetahs after a 100-year absence, and that population that has since doubled with the birth of several litters. And, as of 16 August lions were reintroduced also to the park - bringing back Africa’s iconic predator after 20 years. This is an urgent lifeline for a species whose populations have plummeted across Africa from 200,000 just 100 years ago to fewer than 20,000 today. We need your help to make sure these charismatic and apex predators exist long into the future. Please consider donating via the link in our profile, where 100 % of your donation goes towards supporting our work in the field, for projects like these, andwhere it matters most. 📷 @stevewinterphoto#AfricanParks#LionsReturn#BigCats#ForceForGood#Lions#Cats#BeMoved#Malawi
22.08.2018 17:42:42
Watch: Lions, Africa’s iconic predator, have returned to the plains of Liwonde N
Watch: Lions, Africa’s iconic predator, have returned to the plains of Liwonde National Park in Malawi for the first time in 20 years! A total of nine lions have just been reintroduced to Liwonde (from South Africa and from Majete Wildlife Reserve also in Malawi), through a series of translocations to return the species to the park. Five additional lions were also translocated to Majete Wildlife Reserve from South Africa to increase the genetic diversity of the reserve’s pride. Lion populations have declined by over 90% over the last 100 years as a result of habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, human-wildlife conflict and poaching for the illegal wildlife trade. Now, fewer than 20,000 lions remain across Africa, and have gone extinct in 26 African countries. But through initiatives such as these, Malawi is providing sanctuary for wild lions and is bringing them home. This extraordinary initiative was made possible with support from the Dutch Government, the @lionrecovery, the @leonardodicapriofdn and @leonardodicaprio. The return of these lions is part of a larger predator restoration initiative for Liwonde, where cheetahs were also reintroduced last year. Since 2015, African Parks along with the DNPW have drastically reduced illegal activity; almost 31,000 wire snares have been removed, wildlife conflict has been reduced and now tourism is on the rise, positively impacting local people. Projects like these show that with determination, political will and community and donor support – we can create a better future where nature’s return benefits both people and wildlife. Click the link in our profile to read the full story. 🎥 @warren_smart#AfricanParks#Lions#BigCats#Predators#LionRecovery#Malawi#Liwonde#Wildlife#NationalPark
22.08.2018 14:38:12
Rare sighting: an endangered forest elephant swims safely across the Mambili riv
Rare sighting: an endangered forest elephant swims safely across the Mambili river in Congo’s Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Odzala is situated in the world’s second largest tropical rainforest and besides containing a remarkable abundance of biodiversity, it is also home to the African forest elephant and the western lowland gorilla. Forest elephants have roamed West Africa and Central Africa for millions of years but are now in serious decline across Africa. Hunted for their ivory for the illegal market, forest elephants are extremely hard to monitor and count given the dense, thick forests within which they live. Did you know that forest and savanna elephants are two different species? Besides living in different habitats, they also vary physically. Forest elephants stand up to a meter (3 feet) shorter than savanna elephants and weigh about 2,700 kilograms (6,000 pounds), roughly half that of savanna elephants, which inhabit Southern and East Africa. Forest elephants also have more rounded ears and straighter tusks. More importantly for conservation, female forest elephants first give birth as late as 23 years, with longer birth intervals than their savanna cousins, resulting in forest elephant populations taking a much longer time to recover from poaching. While their numbers have plummeted by as much as 60% in the last few years, and roughly fewer than 100,000 remain, they are the heart of these forest ecosystems and without them, the system falls apart, impacting many other species, including people. Please help us protect Africa’s forest elephants, the beating heart of this Congo paradise, by donating via the link in the bio. 🎥 Torsten Bohm #AfricanParks#Elephants#ForestElephant#Wildlife#Odzala#Congo#Rainforest#SaveTheElephant
21.08.2018 16:28:05
In partnership with the Chadian Government, African Parks assumed management of
In partnership with the Chadian Government, African Parks assumed management of @zakouma_national_park in 2010, to protect the park, its wildlife, and provide needed safety for people and animals alike. After eight years, and having drastically reduced poaching and other illegal activities, African Parks was able to undertake an unprecedented conservation initiative of reintroducing the first six black rhinoceroses (the plan is to bring up to 20 rhinos over the next year) from South Africa in May 2018, almost 50 years after the last one was seen in the park. These firstsix rhinos came by plane where Rangers saluted their arrival on the runway, and over a thousand community members came to welcome them. As these first six adjust to their home, plans are underway to move an additional 14 rhino in 2019, creating a genetically diverse founder population who can breed and thrive in Zakouma. This incredible reintroduction would not be possible without the collective efforts of the Chadian and South African Governments, our generous donors, as well as the journalists and photographers who have been able to capture the story of the rhino, including Margot Raggett and her @rememberingwildlife project who is helping to contribute to the next phase of this project. 📷 @kyledenobrega#AfricanParks#Conservation#Gratitude#RhinosReturn#Zakouma
20.08.2018 16:03:20
Today we wanted to share some of our top #goodnews stories from the year so far,
Today we wanted to share some of our top #goodnews stories from the year so far, and thank all of you for making it possible! ⠀ 1. Six endangered black rhinos were reintroduced to @zakouma_national_park in Chad in May. This historic conservation initiative saw the species restored to the park for the first time in almost 50 years, and brought hope to the fight to save this endangered species.⠀ 2. @garamba_national_park, which is often referred to as ground-zero in the elephant poaching wars, has seen a significant reduction in illegal activity - down 50% last year and only two known elephants poached so far in 2018. Garamba also commemorated its 80th anniversary in May, as one of Africa’s oldest national parks. ⠀ 3. The number of parks under our management increased to 15 this year with the addition of Mangochi Forest Reserve in Malawi, making us one step closer to achieving our goal of managing 20 parks by 2020.⠀ 4. A record number of elephant calves were documented in Zakouma National Park in Chad this year. Zakouma’s elephant population has been on the rise for the first time in decades since 2016; and since we assumed management of the park in 2010 with the Chadian Government, we’ve practically halted poaching. This year we counted 127 claves, in 2011, we counted just one.⠀ 5. Four of our courageous Rangers were honoured by the @alibaba.group and #ParadiseFoundation at the inaugural African Ranger Awards in August. These Rangers represent our 1,000-strong ranger team who are securing a future for Africa’s wildlife, and for the people who call these parks home.⠀ ⠀ These are just a few of the incredible stories from the 15 parks under our management. We hope they serve as a reminder as what together we can achieve. Thanks to you, good news is happening all around us, and we couldn’t do this without you. #AfricanParks#GoodNews#Elephants#Conservation#BeInspired#AForceForGood ⠀ Photos by: 1. @kyledenobrega 2. @lifethroughalensphotography 3. African Parks 4. @kyledenobrega 5. @mana_meadows
17.08.2018 15:21:23
Chinko’s defenders are facing threats head on to protect this extraordinary wild
Chinko’s defenders are facing threats head on to protect this extraordinary wildlife refuge in the Central African Republic. These rangers keep watch over a vast patchwork of savanna and rainforest which spans more than 19,000 km2 (almost twice the size of Yellowstone!) providing safety for the people and wildlife who live here. Chinko (@chinko.project ) is situated in a country mired in civil strife and is an area that has been deeply affected over the past few years by poachers, rebel militants, armed cattle herders and diamond miners. However, African Parks assumed management of Chinko in 2014 because we knew this landscape had one of the greatest ecological potentials in all of Central Africa. Despite this troubled past, vast swaths of natural habitats remained, and remnant populations of key wildlife had miraculously hung on. When we did our first flyover in 2014, we saw hundreds of thousands of cattle in the park and little to no wildlife. Today, all cattle and poaching have been kept out of the core area, and wildlife and people are finding safe harbour in and around the park. We are seeing herds of eland, hartebeest, bongo and waterbuck; we’re hearing lions at night, and even elephants with calves have been spotted. Nature is finding its way back to this area, and a better way of life is happening, for people and wildlife alike. Click the link in the bio to read the full article about Chinko’s transformation in the @guardian by @jack.losh. 📷 @jack.losh#AfricanParks#chinko#rangers#CAR#wildlife#community#forceforgood
16.08.2018 18:00:30
Next
loading