Hubble Space Telescope (@nasahubble) — This is the official account for NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, managed and operated by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.
Join John, EVA engineer Ed Rezac, and astronaut trainer Christy Hansen in this f
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Join John, EVA engineer Ed Rezac, and astronaut trainer Christy Hansen in this final episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about creating a Fastener Capture Plate to capture 111 screws in order to repair the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
21.05.2019 14:02:31
The irregular galaxy NGC 4485 shows all the signs of having been involved in a h
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The irregular galaxy NGC 4485 shows all the signs of having been involved in a hit-and-run accident with a bypassing galaxy. Rather than destroying the galaxy, the chance encounter is spawning a new generation of stars, and presumably planets. The right side of the galaxy is ablaze with star formation, shown in the plethora of young blue stars and star-incubating pinkish nebulas. The left side, however, looks intact. It contains hints of the galaxy’s previous spiral structure, which, at one time, was undergoing normal galactic evolution. The larger culprit galaxy, NGC 4490, is off the bottom of the frame. The two galaxies sideswiped each other millions of years ago and are now 24,000 light-years apart. The gravitational tug-of-war between them created rippling patches of higher-density gas and dust within both galaxies. This activity triggered a flurry of star formation. This galaxy is a nearby example of the kind of cosmic bumper-car activity that was more common billions of years ago when the universe was smaller and galaxies were closer together. For more information, follow the link in our bio. Text credit: Space Telescope Science Institute Image credit: NASA, ESA; acknowledgment: T. Roberts (Durham University, UK), D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts) and the LEGUS Team, R. Tully (University of Hawaii) and R. Chandar (University of Toledo) #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#galaxy#stars#evolution
16.05.2019 14:02:44
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#ToolTimeTuesday Join John and EVA engineer Ed Rezac in this episode of Hubble T
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#ToolTimeTuesday Join John and EVA engineer Ed Rezac in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about developing a wrench-like connector tool to replace Hubble’s Power Control Unit on Servicing Mission 3B in 2002. Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson. Music credits: "Wine On It" by Kevin Blanc [SACEM]; KTSA Publishing SACEM; Gum Tapes; Killer Tracks Production Music. "Breakthrough" by Donn Wilerson [BMI]; Killer Tracks BMI; Killer Tracks Production Music.
14.05.2019 14:05:39
Ten years ago, Hubble's Servicing Mission 4 took place, becoming the most ambiti
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Ten years ago, Hubble's Servicing Mission 4 took place, becoming the most ambitious and complicated to date. Changing out two major science instruments and repairing two others while in space helped to make this mission truly memorable. Thanks to the astronauts of SM4, the Hubble Space Telescope is at the apex of its power and capabilities. To celebrate that important moment in history, NASA has gathered the footage of Servicing Mission 4 for posterity's sake, and archived hours of footage for all to use. For more information, follow the link in our bio. Video Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Tim Childers #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#sm4#10years#anniversary#astronauts#servicing#sts125
12.05.2019 14:01:25
On May 11, 2009, the brave crew of Space Shuttle Atlantis lifted off to make NAS
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On May 11, 2009, the brave crew of Space Shuttle Atlantis lifted off to make NASA's Hubble Space Telescope more powerful than ever before. Hubble's Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) was the most ambitious and complicated to date. Changing out two major science instruments and repairing two others while in space helped to make this mission truly memorable. Thanks to the astronauts of SM4, the Hubble Space Telescope is at the apex of its power and capabilities. To celebrate SM4’s 10 year anniversary, this video gives a quick and in-depth review on the accomplishments of this historic mission. The tools and the knowledge gleaned from SM4 are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars. For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Paul Morris. Music credits: "Aerial" by Oliver Worth [PRS]; Killer Tracks Production Music
11.05.2019 15:36:10
#HubbleFriday Dotted across the sky in the constellation of Pictor (the Painter’
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#HubbleFriday Dotted across the sky in the constellation of Pictor (the Painter’s Easel) is the galaxy cluster highlighted here by Hubble: SPT-CL J0615-5746, or SPT0615 for short. SPT0615, first discovered by the South Pole Telescope less than a decade ago, is a massive cluster of galaxies, one of the farthest observed to cause gravitational lensing. Gravitational lensing occurs when light from a background object is deflected around mass between the object and the observer. Among the identified background objects, there is SPT0615-JD, a galaxy that is thought to have emerged just 500 million years after the big bang. This puts it among the very earliest structures to form in the universe. It is also the farthest galaxy ever imaged by means of gravitational lensing. Just as ancient paintings can tell us about the period of history in which they were painted, so too can ancient galaxies tell us about the era of the universe in which they existed. To learn about cosmological history, astronomers explore the most distant reaches of the universe, probing ever further out into the cosmos. The light from distant objects travels to us from so far away that it takes an immensely long time to reach us, meaning that it carries information from the past — information about the time at which it was emitted. By studying such distant objects, astronomers are continuing to fill the gaps in our picture of what the very early universe looked like, and uncover more about how it evolved into its current state. For more information, follow the link in our bio. Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency) Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, I. Karachentsev et al., F. High et al. #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#galaxy#cluster#gravity#lensing#friday
10.05.2019 14:06:12
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In 1877, Edouard Stephan discovered a tight visual grouping of five galaxies loc
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In 1877, Edouard Stephan discovered a tight visual grouping of five galaxies located in the constellation Pegasus. The galaxies of Stephan's Quintet are both overlapping and interacting, and have become the most famous among the compact groups of galaxies. Astronomers have long known that four of the galaxies (all of which are yellowish-white in this video) form a physical group in space, while the fifth (bluish) is a foreground galaxy. In addition, a sixth galaxy (yellowish-white and on the far left) is likely to be part of the physical grouping. Hence, this 2D quintet that is a 3D quartet may actually be a 2D sextet that is a 3D quintet. This visualization makes apparent the spatial distribution of these galaxies. The video starts with a view that matches our 2D perspective. As the sequence travels in 3D, the foreground blue spiral, NGC 7320, quickly passes by the camera. The possible sixth galaxy member on the left, NGC 7320C, is seen at roughly the same distance as the remaining four galaxies. The camera turns to pass between two strongly interacting galaxies, NGC 7319 (left) and NGC 7318B (right), with each galaxy's spiral structure distorted by the gravitational interaction. In contrast, NGC 7318B overlaps in 2D with the more distant elliptical NGC 7318A, but does not have a strong interaction. The other elliptical, NGC 7317, is also seen as more distant than the strongly interacting pair. In 3D, the four or five galaxies in this group are gathered together by their mutual gravity, and may collide and merge together in the future. For more information on Hubble, follow the link in our bio. Credits: G. Bacon, J. DePasquale, F. Summers, Z. Levay (STScI) #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#galaxies#flythrough#3d
08.05.2019 14:01:45
Join John and EVA engineer Ed Rezac in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn
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Join John and EVA engineer Ed Rezac in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about the difficult job of replacing Hubble’s Rate Sensor Units on Servicing Mission 3A in 1999 and the resulting tool created to make the job easier. Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars.
07.05.2019 14:00:01
#HubbleClassic This is the last "pretty picture" taken by the Wide Field and Pla
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#HubbleClassic This is the last "pretty picture" taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 before it was removed from Hubble in May 2009. It shows a planetary nebula (clouds of gas shed by a dying star) known as Kohoutek 4-55 (named after its discoverer, astronomer Lubos Kohoutek). For more information on Hubble, follow the link in our bio. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: R. Sahai and J. Trauger (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#nebula#wfpc2
06.05.2019 14:01:56
#HubbleFriday Few of the universe’s residents are as iconic as the spiral galaxy
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#HubbleFriday Few of the universe’s residents are as iconic as the spiral galaxy. These limelight-hogging celestial objects combine whirling, pinwheeling arms with scatterings of sparkling stars, glowing bursts of gas, and dark, weaving lanes of cosmic dust, creating truly awesome scenes — especially when viewed through a telescope such as Hubble. In fact, this image from Hubble frames a perfect spiral specimen: the stunning NGC 2903. NGC 2903 is located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo, and was studied as part of a Hubble survey of the central regions of roughly 145 nearby disk galaxies. This study aimed to help astronomers better understand the relationship between the black holes that lurk at the cores of galaxies like these, and the rugby-ball-shaped bulge of stars, gas and dust at the galaxy’s center — such as that seen in this image. For more information, follow the link in our bio. Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency) Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Ho et al. #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#galaxy#spiral#leo
03.05.2019 14:02:37
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How far is far? And, how do you know when you get there? In 1995, astronomers de
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How far is far? And, how do you know when you get there? In 1995, astronomers decided to use Hubble to conduct a bold and daring experiment to address this puzzle. For 10 consecutive days, Hubble stared at one tiny, seemingly empty patch of sky for 1 million seconds. The gamble of precious telescope time paid off. Hubble captured the feeble glow of myriad never-before-seen galaxies. Many of the galaxies are so far away it has taken billions of years for their light to reach us. Therefore, the view is like looking down a "time corridor," where galaxies can be seen as they looked billions of years ago. Hubble became astronomy's ultimate time machine. The resulting landmark image is called the Hubble Deep Field. At the time, the image won the gold medal for being the farthest peek into the universe ever made. Its stunning success encouraged astronomers to pursue a series of Hubble deep-field surveys. The succeeding surveys uncovered more galaxies at greater distance from Earth, thanks to new cameras installed on Hubble during astronaut servicing missions. The cameras increased the telescope's power to look even deeper into the universe. These surveys provided astronomers with a huge scrapbook of images, showing how, following the big bang, galaxies built themselves up over time to become the large, majestic assemblages seen today in the nearby universe. Now, astronomers are releasing a new deep-field image by weaving together exposures from several of these previous galaxy "fishing expeditions." Their efforts have produced the largest, most comprehensive “history book” of galaxies in the universe. The snapshot, a combination of nearly 7,500 separate Hubble exposures, represents 16 years' worth of observations. The ambitious endeavor is called the Hubble Legacy Field. For more info, follow the link in our bio. Credits: NASA, ESA, and G. Illingworth (University of California, Santa Cruz; UCO/Lick Observatory) #NASA#Hubble#space#science#astronomy#universe#telescope#cosmos#galaxies#bigbang#deepfield#legacy
02.05.2019 14:04:17
Join John and EVA manager Russ Werneth in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to le
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Join John and EVA manager Russ Werneth in this episode of Hubble Tool Time to learn about the pistol grip tool developed for Hubble’s second servicing mission in 1997, a tool that astronauts now use on almost every spacewalk! Retired NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld hosts this six-part mini-series about the tools used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. Hubble was uniquely designed to be serviced in space so that components could be repaired and upgraded. Astronauts using custom-designed tools performed challenging spacewalks on five servicing missions from 1993 to 2009 to keep Hubble operating so that it could change our fundamental understanding of the universe. In addition to enabling Hubble's scientific discoveries, the tools developed by teams at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested in collaboration with the Johnson Space Center furthered NASA's human exploration capabilities. These tools and the knowledge gleaned from the Hubble servicing missions are used today by astronauts on the International Space Station, and will be critical to NASA's future crewed missions to the Moon and Mars.
30.04.2019 14:01:23
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