Laurence Ellis (@laurenceellis) — Instagramer 📸 🌈 🦄🏄
Shout out to Eben Hopson, I hear it’s getting dark up there 🌚! Keep up the incre
Shout out to Eben Hopson, I hear it’s getting dark up there 🌚! Keep up the incredible work, was a pleasure to meet you and all the young people campaigning to save the arctic 🙌🐳❄️ @ebenwhopson@arcticyouthambassadors@makamonture@alaskaseagrant@akimuk_qussauyaq@thealaskanmooseman Eben Hopson is a resident of Utqiaġvik and part of the Arctic Youth Ambassador program, based out of the Alaska Geographic Field Institute. Central to the mission of the ambassadors is the promotion of under- standing and education around climate-based change in Arctic communities. Ebens grandfather, Eben Hopson Sr, helped organize Alaska's first regional land claims organization which entered an aboriginal claim to all of the traditional land of the Arctic Slope Inupiat. He became the first Executive Director of the Arctic Slope Native Association (ASNA) which launched the Alaska Native Land Claims Movement in 1965. @documentjournal@nickvogelson@princessoftokyo
13.11.2018 10:46:28
“We live on a water planet, surrounded by a delicate, incredibly thin atmosphere
“We live on a water planet, surrounded by a delicate, incredibly thin atmosphere. And without the atmosphere above us to filter out dangerous solar radiation and retain heat, the Earth would be a frozen, lifeless ball. For years, the scientific community has argued that our climate will be changed by the uncontrolled emissions of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, caused by the burning of fossil fuels and other industrial activi- ties. Those warnings have gone largely unheeded by our politicians. We are now paying the price of that inaction: the planet’s temperature is rising; extreme droughts and floods are expanding; the oceans are warming and becoming more acid, destroying fish populations and coral reefs; and ice in the Arctic, Antarctic, and Greenland is melting at an accelerating rate, leading to sea-level rise and new threats to coastal communities. In order to stave off catastrophic ecological and economic consequences, following decades of inaction, humanity must now act on two fronts: We must rapidly ramp up efforts to slow the rate of climate change by eliminating the combustion of coal, oil, and gas and other actions that emit dangerous warming gases, and we must simultaneously prepare to adapt to the effects of those climate changes we can no longer prevent.” Words by Professor Peter H Gleick - Founder of the Pacific Institute and MacArthur Fellow. Photograph taken in Resurrection bay in the Gulf of Alaska. Published in Document Journal @documentjournal
08.11.2018 15:06:17
A teenage couple on the bank of the Kuskokwim River, Bethel, Alaska. With a popu
A teenage couple on the bank of the Kuskokwim River, Bethel, Alaska. With a population of more than 6,000, Bethel is the largest community on the Kuskokwim River. It has been home to the Yup’ik people and their ancestors for thousands of years. I spent a month in Alaska this summer, visiting some of the communities most affected by man made climate change - not just in Alaska, these communities are experiencing the effects of change at a more extreme level, than almost any other place on our planet. If current emissions trends are accurate, most of these coastal communities in the arctic will be lost in the next 10-15 years - some like Shishmaref, have already been lost to the sea. The melting of the Arctic will not just affect places like Alaska, some scientists believe that the Arctic hasn’t seen ice melt like this in 5,000 years. If the ice sheet melts entirely, sea levels would rise 20 feet, leaving Lower Manhattan underwater. A 26 page portfolio of these images and accompanying essay by climate change scientist Peter Gleick, published in Document Journal @documentjournal
07.11.2018 13:51:09
Nearly a quarter of the Northern Hemispheres landmass sits above the permafrost
Nearly a quarter of the Northern Hemispheres landmass sits above the permafrost - a frozen layer of ground which sometimes reaches as deep as 2000ft. Most buildings in Utqiaġvik are constructed on stilts to avoid melting the permafrost immediately below, which in turn would cause the structures to sink. Stilts or no stilts, many houses in Utqiaġvik are experiencing extreme and visually apparent subsidence, due to the thawing beneath them as a result of our warming climate. Trapped in the this frozen soil is more than twice the carbon found in the atmosphere 🌎 💨 A portfolio of images looking at the effects of climate change in mainly indigenous communities located in rural Alaska. Published in Document Journal. @documentjournal@thealaskanmooseman@arcticyouthambassadors@alaskaseagrant@the_sca@nickvogelson@princessoftokyo@makamonture@akimuk_qussauyaq@c.j.miller_@therealseejay
05.11.2018 18:22:04
Apart from the air we breathe, no other natural resource is as important as wate
Apart from the air we breathe, no other natural resource is as important as water to our health and wellbeing. The planet’s population, which now exceeds 7.5 billion, is diverting, depleting, and contaminating water and emitting greenhouse gases in such quantities as to change the very climate on which our lives depend. Seward Boat Harbor, Seward. A young man holds a silver salmon caught during the 63rd Annual Seward Silver Salmon Derby. Many coastal towns have faced fishery closures in recent years, which has led to the declaration of commercial fishery disasters and the cancellation of similar derbies in communities farther south, including Juneau and Wrangell. A portfolio of images published by document journal. Thank you @thealaskanmooseman@arcticyouthambassadors@makamonture@documentjournal@c.j.miller_@nickvogelson@princessoftokyo
02.11.2018 16:26:56
クリストファー・ケインリゾート2019 @christopherkane @kanechristopher82 @tammyckane @davidbailey
31.10.2018 18:03:46
Mike and Cindy have lived in Utqiaġvik for more than 30 years. Behind them is w
Mike and Cindy have lived in Utqiaġvik for more than 30 years. Behind them is what was once their garden. The rate of shoreline erosion in the Arctic has more than doubled in the last 50 years. Mike and Cindy’s house is now 25 feet from the shore - it’s not uncommon for shorelines on the north slope to now loose that distance in a month. Mike and Cindy (both keen photographers) hold 2 of their photographs taken from the shore. @arcticyouthambassadors@documentjournal@nickvogelson@gilmoredan@princessoftokyo@akimuk_qussauyaq@ebenwhopson@c.j.miller_@therealseejay@the_sca@thealaskanmooseman@seagrant_noaa@makamonture
31.10.2018 10:30:20
Robert, Osias, and Sebastian of the Whalers, the Barrow High School football tea
Robert, Osias, and Sebastian of the Whalers, the Barrow High School football team. The town of Barrow recently reverted to its original indigenous Inupiaq name of ‘Utqiaġvik’, meaning ‘a place to gather wild roots.’ The effects of climate change are most extreme in these remote arctic communities. In just 17 years, the average temperature in Utqiaġvik has climbed 7.8 degrees. Situated on the Arctic coast, 320 miles above the Arctic Circle, Utqiaġvik is the northern- most town in the US. @arcticyouthambassadors@documentjournal@nickvogelson@gilmoredan@princessoftokyo@akimuk_qussauyaq@ebenwhopson@c.j.miller_@therealseejay@the_sca@thealaskanmooseman@seagrant_noaa@makamonture
31.10.2018 09:16:39
A photographic project I worked on this summer looking at the human consequences
A photographic project I worked on this summer looking at the human consequences of climate change, particularly among more vulnerable indigenous coastal communities. Tidewater glaciers along Alaska’s rocky southern coast, like Aialik, pictured, have been retreating dramatically due to a warming climate. Alaska’s melting glaciers contribute significantly to rising sea levels that are beginning to inundate low-lying coastal areas around the world. The name of this glacier comes from the native Sugs’tun word for “place of unexpected”. A portfolio of the images an accompanying essay by MacArthur Fellow Peter H Gleick, published by Document Journal. @nickvogelson@gilmoredan@princessoftokyo@thealaskanmooseman@makamonture@documentjournal@akimuk_qussauyaq@the_sca@arcticyouthambassadors@ebenwhopson@therealseejay
29.10.2018 06:50:46
The shoreline and what was previously the jetty of Napakiak, a small Inuit villa
The shoreline and what was previously the jetty of Napakiak, a small Inuit village on the north bank of the Kuskokwim River in western Alaska, home to 354 people. Tarpaulin and logs form the makeshift defences the villagers have constructed to try and slow the erosion. In Europe we discuss climate change in the parameters of cm’s and years. In many parts of Alaska, it’s a understood in feet and weeks. I was the first outside photographer to visit and document the brutal effects of climate change, on this small indigenous village. The second photo shows the post it notes, where the mayor had kept a record of the distance of the shoreline to the village buildings - 60ft of their shoreline was eroded in 3 months. The school (and many homes) will be washed away by next year. Thank you to Jeff Chen and everyone at the Arctic Youth Ambassadors for the help in co-ordinating this visit. Big thanks to CJ and your dad for the boat and getting us there. @therealseejay@the_sca@arcticyouthambassadors@makamonture@documentjournal@akimuk_qussauyaq@kate_mcw
26.10.2018 07:10:37
Matthew, Jeffrey and Louden leaving high school wrestling practice, Utqiaġvik, A
Matthew, Jeffrey and Louden leaving high school wrestling practice, Utqiaġvik, Alaska. America’s most northernmost community, 330 miles north of the arctic circle. I spent over a week in this profoundly isolated town, documenting the lives of mainly young indigenous Alaskan people and how their day to day living is affected by climate change - the arctic is warming almost twice as fast as the rest of the planet. I guess there is no correct way to approach this incredibly complex and diverse subject. Although personally, I was drawn to showing how normal and everyday these perilously threatened community’s are. Like these guys above 🇺🇸 Thank you to Document for publishing a portfolio of these images, and to Peter Gleick, founder of the Pacific Institute, for the accompanying essay @documentjournal@nickvogelson@princessoftokyo
23.10.2018 23:05:08
During August of this year, I spent a month visiting several small communities i
During August of this year, I spent a month visiting several small communities in rural Alaska, documenting the effects of man made climate change on the places they considered home. I’m deeply grateful for the kind support of everyone who donated their time to this project, I believe this story to be the collective product of everyone who took part. The photograph above is of Marine Deckhand Natalie Hunter, holding a chunk of glacial ice that has calved off the Aialik Glacier. The accompanying essay is by Peter H. Gleick, a climate and water scientist and MacArthur Fellow. Here is a quote from Peter and the final paragraph of the text. "We must act. Sustainability pioneer Donella Meadows once said, “There is too much bad news to justify complacency. There is too much good news to justify despair.” The good news is that we can move toward a future where every living thing has the water it needs to survive and thrive. We can grow more food with less water using smart irrigation systems. We can wash our clothes and clean our dishes with efficient appliances. We can adapt our diets and consumer choices to reduce our water and carbon footprints. We can move away from reliance on dirty, climate-changing energy sources toward renewable, clean energy. We can take natural resources out of the realm of violence and conflict and move toward peace and cooperation. And we can participate in decisions about what kind of politicians and governments we want by speaking out, voting, and demonstrating. But the transition from our current unsustainable world to a sustainable future will require the participation of all of us, the development of new technologies and ways of thinking, and the overturning of old, outmoded, dangerous ideas and practices. A sustainable future is possible. Let’s make it a reality." @petergleick Special thanks to Nick and Michael for your continued support with these expeditions and picking up the phone at weird hours of the night, when I had no idea of the time or day, immersed in 24hr daylight surrounded by polar bears. 🐻 @nickvogelson@princessoftokyo@documentjournal
18.10.2018 14:42:31
VIRGIL ABLOH™. Photographed at home in Chicago. Document Journal, Fall Winter 20
VIRGIL ABLOH™. Photographed at home in Chicago. Document Journal, Fall Winter 2018 @virgilabloh@nickvogelson@princessoftokyo
18.10.2018 12:43:37
Next
loading